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Delhi: Brace yourself for foggier days ahead, says IMD

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>While Delhiites gear up to usher in the New Year in style, weather might play a spoilsport, with dense fog and smog expected in the coming week. The national Capital was engulfed in a thick layer of fog on Sunday, resulting in a low visibility of around 300m.At 8.30am, visibility was recorded at 600m. It dropped down to 300m at 11.30am, before improving a bit three hours later. A shallow layer of fog enveloped the city till afternoon, while sun was not visible throughout the day. Maximum and minimum temperatures were recorded at 24.5 degrees Celsius and 8 degrees Celsius, respectively.According to an India Meteorological Department (IMD) official, the maximum temperature was expected to rise in the coming week, with shallow fog likely to occur in Delhi-NCR, especially on December 29 and 30. The weatherman said the maximum humidity was recorded as 98 per cent, whereas minimum was at 91%. “Though the weather was quite pleasant on Sunday, the coming days might be a little warmer, as maximum temperature is going to increase,” said R Vishen, Scientist-In-Charge, Regional Meteorological Centre (RMC), IMD.Meanwhile, despite the weather helping, air quality in the Capital remained in the “very poor” category. The Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) on Sunday marked the Capital’s air under “very poor” category. “The winter has finally begun to set in and there will be more smog in the coming days. The air quality might even reach the “severe” category,” said Anumita Roy Chowdhury, Head of the Centre for Science and Environment’s (CSE) clean air campaign.In the neighbouring east and west Uttar Pradesh, moderate fog with isolated dense fog in many areas is expected to build up in the next few days. This weather spells trouble for people with asthma and a weak immune system.

From low pressure area to very severe cyclonic storm: Here’s how IMD tracked Cyclone Vardah

New Delhi: A small dot marked on the screens of weathermen at the IMD signalled to them that a very severe cyclonic storm was building up in the South Andaman Sea, nine days ahead of the landfall of ‘Vardah’ that ravaged coastal Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.

The dot on the screen signified pressure movement over a particular area, which had the potential of snowballing into a cyclone. Weathermen at the IMD’s Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (RSMC) in New Delhi, who monitor any slight change in weather patterns around India, especially in the cyclone-prone Bay of Bengal, realised on 3 December that a low pressure area was being formed near the South Andaman Sea.

PTI

PTI

The pressure belt had traversed from the South China Sea, flowing over Thailand and Vietnam which had reduced its speed considerably due to its contact with the land. “So, as soon as it reached the South Andman Sea, it again got traction. The warm water in the Indian Ocean and the South Andaman Sea gave it momentum and then started the process of forming a low pressure area. We realised that there was an anti-clockwise pattern, the wind speed around it had increased more than other parts of the sea,” said M Mohapatra, Additional Director General (Services) with the India Meteorological Department, who has been in the business of forecasting cyclones. He was also the head of Cyclone Warning Division during Phailin and Hudhud.

September to December is also the time when weathermen at the Cyclone Warning Division of the IMD avoid taking leaves. For them, this is cyclone season. Realising that the low pressure area was developing into something stronger, the officials started gathering more data, pressing into service IMD’s two doppler radars at Chennai and Machilipatnam, coastal automatic weather stations and manned observatories, besides its buoys in the sea.

Satellite images from INSAT-3D and Met services of Thailand and Malaysia were also used. With constant hourly updates, the data gathered was then coalesced, a usual practise. After analysis and clearance from senior meteorologists, a small dot was marked to track its path.

With every passing day, the low pressure area became more intense. On 6 December, it turned into a depression and graduated to deep depression the very next day.

Since then there was daily monitoring and alert reports being sent to the Andaman and Nicobar Administration, and state governments of Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Odisha, Puducherry and Kerala.

It was declared a cyclonic storm on the morning of 8 December and became a severe cyclonic storm on the midnight of December 9. Vardah was finally declared a very severe cyclonic storm on the evening of 10 December.

First Published On : Dec 19, 2016 17:52 IST

Low-intensity earthquake in Arunachal

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>A low intensity earthquake was reported this morning at a place in Upper Siang district close to the Indo-China border.According to the India Meteorological Department (IMD),the slight intensity earthquake occured at 7.46 AM and the Richter scale readings showed the magnitude of the tremor was 3.8.The depth of the occurence was 106 km. The epicentre of the earthquake was recorded at Lat 28.6 degree North and Long 94.9 degree East which is around 116 km from district headquarter Yingkiong.No loss of life or damage to property has been reported so far, state Chief Secretary Shakuntala Gamlin told PTI after taking stock of the situation from district officers.She has directed officers to be on their toes to assess the situation properly and keep her posted continuously.

Cyclone Vardah LIVE: 2 killed as storm slams Chennai; Army starts rescue operationss

Cyclone Vardah LIVE: 2 killed as storm slams Chennai; heavy rains expected, says NDMA

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By Updated: Dec 12, 2016 16:27 IST

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New Delhi: Cyclonic storm Vardah, which was earlier expected to weaken considerably, may not see its intensity going down when it makes landfall near Chennai on Monday. According to the Cyclone Warning Division of the India Meteorological Department, (IMD), Vardah, which is currently, a very severe cyclonic storm, will weaken, but only to a severe cyclonic storm.

Cyclone Vardah over Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.Cyclone Vardah over Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.

Cyclone Vardah over Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.

The earlier forecast made by the IMD was that it would weaken into a cyclonic storm, thereby reducing its intensity considerably. At 9.30 am, the cyclone was lay centered around 105 kms east-northeast of Chennai.

By the time it makes a landfall, its wind speed is expected to be 100-110 kilometres per hours with winds gusting up to 120 kmph. The wind speed during a very severe cyclonic storm is 120 to 130 kmph. In a severe cyclonic storm the wind speed is somewhere between 110 to 80 kilometres per hour. One of the major reasons for destruction in any cyclone is the wind velocity, apart from heavy to heavy rains and flooding.

Rainfall at most places with isolated heavy to very heavy falls over south coastal Andhra Pradesh, north coastal Tamil Nadu and Puducherry is very likely during 36 hrs. The rainfall intensity will increase gradually becoming heavy to very heavy rainfall (7-19 cm) at a few places and isolated extremely heavy rainfall (20 centimetres) over Chennai, Thiruvallur and Kanchipuram districts of Tamil Nadu and Nellore and Prakasam districts of Andhra Pradesh on 12 December, the IMD said.

Tidal wave of about one metre height above the astronomical tide is very likely to inundate the low lying areas of Chennai, Thiruvallur and Kanchipuram districts of Tamil Nadu and Nellore districts of Andhra Pradesh during the time of landfall.

With inputs from PTI

First Published On : Dec 12, 2016 16:26 IST

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Cyclone Vardah LIVE: 2 killed as storm slams Chennai; heavy rains expected, says NDMA

Cyclone Vardah LIVE: 2 killed as storm slams Chennai; heavy rains expected, says NDMA

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New Delhi: Cyclonic storm Vardah, which was earlier expected to weaken considerably, may not see its intensity going down when it makes landfall near Chennai on Monday. According to the Cyclone Warning Division of the India Meteorological Department, (IMD), Vardah, which is currently, a very severe cyclonic storm, will weaken, but only to a severe cyclonic storm.

Cyclone Vardah over Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.Cyclone Vardah over Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.

Cyclone Vardah over Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.

The earlier forecast made by the IMD was that it would weaken into a cyclonic storm, thereby reducing its intensity considerably. At 9.30 am, the cyclone was lay centered around 105 kms east-northeast of Chennai.

By the time it makes a landfall, its wind speed is expected to be 100-110 kilometres per hours with winds gusting up to 120 kmph. The wind speed during a very severe cyclonic storm is 120 to 130 kmph. In a severe cyclonic storm the wind speed is somewhere between 110 to 80 kilometres per hour. One of the major reasons for destruction in any cyclone is the wind velocity, apart from heavy to heavy rains and flooding.

Rainfall at most places with isolated heavy to very heavy falls over south coastal Andhra Pradesh, north coastal Tamil Nadu and Puducherry is very likely during 36 hrs. The rainfall intensity will increase gradually becoming heavy to very heavy rainfall (7-19 cm) at a few places and isolated extremely heavy rainfall (20 centimetres) over Chennai, Thiruvallur and Kanchipuram districts of Tamil Nadu and Nellore and Prakasam districts of Andhra Pradesh on 12 December, the IMD said.

Tidal wave of about one metre height above the astronomical tide is very likely to inundate the low lying areas of Chennai, Thiruvallur and Kanchipuram districts of Tamil Nadu and Nellore districts of Andhra Pradesh during the time of landfall.

With inputs from PTI

First Published On : Dec 12, 2016 16:26 IST

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Cyclone Vardah: Two people killed in Tamil Nadu as landfall process begins

Chennai: Two persons were killed as heavy rains accompanied by high velocity winds on Monday pounded the city and coastal districts of north Tamil Nadu due to severe cyclonic storm “Vardah” which began making landfall near Chennai, uprooting hundreds of trees, disrupting land and air transport and throwing normal life out of gear.

“The landfall process of cyclone Vardah has begun,” the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said.

According to M Mohapatra, Additional Director General (Services) of IMD, the “eye” of the Cyclone is 20 kms off Chennai.

“The wind speed near Chennai 90-100 kmph. Heavy rains and storm surge is expected. Landfall process has commenced at 2 pm. The cyclone will cross between 2-5 pm,” Mohapatra said.

Power supply was suspended in many parts of these regions as a precautionary measure. About 8,000 people from low lying areas in north Chennai, Pazhaverkadu in Tiruvallur district and villages off Mamallapuram, in Kanchipuram district were safely evacuated to 95 relief shelters, officials said.

Flight operations at the airport in Chennai have been suspended till 5 pm.

Long distance buses have been stalled and traffic came to a grinding halt in most areas with uprooted trees and electric poles blocking the roads.

All suburban train services have also been suspended.

Representational image. Getty images

Representational image. Getty images

Southern Railway announced cancellation of all 17 trains originating from Chennai central, as well as Egmore.

State Principal Secretary (Revenue Administration) K Satyagopal said “human loss is two”, without elaborating.

In a statement, he said 260 trees and 37 electric poles had fallen and 190 tress removed. As many 224 roads were blocked and 24 huts damaged.

Trains to various destinations, including Bangalore, Hyderabad, Madurai, Coimbatore were all cancelled, Southern Railway said.

At Kalpakkam, all safety measures have been taken in view of the atomic energy centre there, they said.

Over 15 teams of NDRF have been deployed in various coastal regions of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh, where over 9,400 people living along the Bay of Bengal coast were evacuated to relief camps amid heavy rains.

Seven army columns comprising around 70-80 personnel each are on standby and one has already been requisitioned in Tiruvallur.

Vardah is expected to later move towards Andhra Pradesh.

In Chennai, only a minuscule number of vehicles plied as heavy winds and rains posed serious obstacles to movement.

In Chennai, traffic on arterial GST Road was affected with some trees falling near the Officers Training Academy point at St Thomas Mount.

A tree fell on a car at Ekkatuthangal near Metro Railway Station. Similarly, instances of trees getting uprooted were reported in many areas in all three coastal districts, even as Corporation workers in Chennai and municipal staffers in other districts were working to clear them amidst heavy rain and gusty winds.

Vehicular movement on the Ashok Pillar-Kodambakkam main road was affected with fallen tree branches.

Heavy winds also snapped electricity wires, flung barricades put up for traffic regulation in several points of the city, including Kathipara.

Meanwhile, the Tamil Nadu government said all measures are in place to tackle Vardah with Chief Minister O Panneerselvam holding a high-level meeting of top officials at the Secretariat.

The state government in an official release asked residents of Chennai to not venture out of their homes till about 4 pm when the cyclone will cross the coast.

First Published On : Dec 12, 2016 15:56 IST

Cyclonic storm Vardah to make landfall near Chennai, NDRF teams deployed in AP, TN

Chennai/New Delhi: Severe cyclonic storm Vardah over the Bay of Bengal will make landfall near Chennai on Monday, the weather office said on Sunday, as the coastal states of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh brace to deal with it.

The system is expected to bring heavy rainfall in coastal districts of Tamil Nadu, including Chennai, and southern Andhra Pradesh. “Vardah lay centred at about 440 km east of Chennai and the system is expected to move westwards and cross Chennai by 12 December afternoon,” S Balachandran, Director, Area Cyclone Warning Centre, said in Chennai. However, its intensity will get reduced considerably by the time it makes the landfall.

The Met office in Delhi has briefed the PMO and the Cabinet Secretariat on the cyclonic storm.

Representational image. AFP

Representational image. AFP

KJ Ramesh, director general of the IMD said, “I have personally spoken to chief secretaries of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh, while the regional Met offices are in constant touch with the disaster management commissioners of these two states.”

Meanwhile, the Regional Meteorological Centre (RMC) at Chennai said the storm is expected to bring heavy rainfall in northern coastal districts of Tamil Nadu, including the capital city. Southern Andhra Pradesh is also expected to receive heavy showers.

Wind speed would be in the order of 40-50 kph, it said.

Isolated heavy to very heavy rain is likely to commence this evening in north coastal Tamil Nadu and Puducherry and southern Andhra Pradesh, the RMC said in its weather warning put on its website. Squally winds and rough to very rough sea conditions are expected along and off Andhra Pradesh, north Tamil Nadu and Puducherry coasts from tonight, it said.

“Storm surge of about 1 metre above astronomical tide is expected at the time of landfall,” the RMC said.

The IMD said it may cause damage to thatched huts and power and communication lines.

The damage may also be caused to paddy crops, banana, papaya trees and orchards in Chennai, Thiruvallur and Kanchipuram districts of Tamil Nadu; Ongole and Nellore districts of Andhra Pradesh and Puducherry, the IMD said in its advisory.

It also urged fishermen in Tamil Nadu, Puducherry and Andhra Pradesh coasts to keep away from the seas for the next 48 hours.

The National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) said the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) teams have been deployed in Tamil Nadu on account of the cyclonic storm.

The NDRF teams, each consisting of 38 rescuers, have been deployed in Chennai, Tiruvallore and Kanchipuram, the force said on its official Twitter handle.

The teams have also been deployed at Nellore, Sulurpeta, Parkasham and Chittoor in Andhra Pradesh, it tweeted.

The force has also asked people to get information from TV and radio on the cyclone and advised them to keep a stock of dry fruits and keep their mobile phones charged.

Cyclone Nada, which later weakened, had made a landfall near Chennai in the first week of December, bringing much-needed showers in Tamil Nadu. The state has witnessed a below normal Southwest Monsoon as well as Northeast Monsoon, a phenomenon which brings rains in some parts of southern India, especially Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.

Meanwhile, the Tamil Nadu government has put the administration of the respective districts on alert even as the Navy assumed a “high degree” of preparedness to involve itself for possible rescue operations.

State Revenue Minister RB Uthayakumar said the district administration of Chennai, Kancheepuram, Tiruvallore and Villupuram have put in preventive steps to avoid any inconvenience to the public and are prepared to face any eventuality.

The Eastern Naval Command (ENC), for its part, “has assumed high degree of readiness to render necessary
assistance.”

“All operational ships have been readied up and kept standby to undertake Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) operations including evacuation, should the situation demand,” a PIB (Defence) release said.

These ships were embarked with additional divers, doctors, inflatable rubber boats, integral helicopters and relief material that include food, tentage, clothes, medicines and blankets, it said.

Further, 30 diving teams with Gemini boats and four platoons with additional relief material are ready to be pressed into action at short notice, it said.

The ENC is closely monitoring the situation and is in constant communication with the state administration to augment rescue and relief operations, it said.

Naval aircraft were also “standing by” at the Naval Air stations Rajali and Dega to undertake reconnaissance, rescue, casualty evacuation and air drop of relief material to the stranded, it added.

First Published On : Dec 11, 2016 16:39 IST

Cyclonic storm Vardah likely to cross Andhra Pradesh-Tamil Nadu border on Monday

Vijayawada: Authorities on Sunday sounded an alert in Andhra Pradesh and adjoining Tamil Nadu as cyclonic storm ‘Vardah’ over the Bay of Bengal has turned into a “very severe” one.

The storm is likely to cross north Tamil Nadu and south Andhra Pradesh coast by Monday afternoon, said Indian Meteorological Department on Sunday.

According to IMD, ‘Vardah’ over west central and adjoining south Bay of Bengal moved further westwards and lay centred at 530 hours over west central and adjoining southwest Bay of Bengal about 520 km east-southeast of Nellore, 490 km east-southeast of Machilipatnam and 480 km east-northeast of Chennai.

“The storm is very likely to move nearly west-southeastwards and maintain its intensity till Sunday evening. Thereafter it will weaken gradually while moving towards south Andhra Pradesh coast and adjoining north Tamil Nadu coast,” the IMD said.

Representational image. AFP

Representational image. AFP

The Met office has forecast light to moderate rains at many places with isolated heavy to very heavy falls over south Andhra coast and north coastal Tamil Nadu from Sunday evening for subsequent 36 hours. Light to moderate rains are likely to occur over north coastal Andhra.

Strong winds with speed of 40-50 kmph are likely along the coast from Sunday. The speed may increase to 70-80 kmph at the time of landfall. Damage to thatched huts, power and communication lines, roads and crops is expected.

As the sea will be rough, fishermen have been advised not to venture into the sea for next 48 hours. Authorities have hoisted third warning signal at all ports on Andhra coast.

District administration in Krishna, Guntur, Prakasam and Nellore have been alerted to take all precautionary measures. Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N. Chandrababu Naidu, who has cancelled his visit to the UAE and Kuwait, is monitoring the situation from the command and control centre in Vijayawada.

Naidu deputed four senior IAS officers to four districts to take necessary steps to minimise the loss of lives and property. Two teams of National Disaster Response Force have reached Nellore district.

First Published On : Dec 11, 2016 11:26 IST

Deep depression over southeast Bay of Bengal has intensified into Cyclone Nada: IMD

A deep depression over the southeast Bay of Bengal has intensified into Cyclone Nada, according to a circular issued by India Meteorological Department (IMD).

Cyclone. 380

Graphical representation of Cyclone NADA. India Meteorological Department

Light to moderate rainfall is expected at many places, and it is expected to begin in coastal Tamil Nadu from Wednesday evening. But heavy to very heavy rainfall is also expected in parts of coastal Tamil Nadu on 1 and 2 December. Light to moderate rainfall at many places with isolated heavy showers is very likely over Kerala over the weekend.

The depression over the Bay of Bengal has moved northwestwards over the past six hours with a speed of around 15 kilometres per hour. It has intensified into a deep depression, around 830 kilometre southeast of Chennai, 780 kilometre southeast of Puducherry and 490 kilometres southeast of Trincomalee (Sri Lanka), according to the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre for Tropical Cylones Over North Indian Ocean of the IMD.

Sea condition would be rough to very rough along & off Tamil Nadu and Puducherry coasts from 1 st December onward. Damage to thatched huts is expected. According to the circular issued by the IMD’s Earth System Science Organisation, the deep depression over southeast Bay of Bengal moved northwestwards during past six hours with a speed of around 25 kmph.

The system is very likely to move west-northwestward, intensify further and cross north Tamil Nadu coast between Vedaranniyam and Puducherry, close to Cuddalore by early hours of 2 December.

First Published On : Nov 30, 2016 14:55 IST

Deep depression over Bay of Bengal, likely to turn into cyclonic storm

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Fishermen were asked by the IMD on Sunday to be cautions while venturing into sea along the Odisha coast in view of a deep depression over the Bay of Bengal, with the system likely to intensify into a cyclonic storm.A depression over east-central Bay of Bengal moved east-north-eastwards, intensified into a deep depression on Sunday and lay centered over east-central Bay of Bengal, about 950 km east-southeast of Gopalpur, the MeT Department said.The system is most likely to intensify into a cyclonic storm in 24 hours and move north-eastwards to reach close to north Myanmar coast shortly. Thereafter, it will recurve initially north-northwestwards skirting Myanmar coast and then north-westwards towards the of north-west Bay of Bengal, it said.While sporadic rainfall may occur in 11 districts in the central and north Odisha on October 26 and 27, weather elsewhere in the state would be generally dry during the next 24 hours, but the sky would be cloudy, Director of the Meteorological Centre here, Sarat Chandra Sahu said.However, Distant Cautionary Signal Number One (DC-I) has been hoisted at all ports in Odisha and fishermen are advised to be cautious while venturing into interior and distant sea along Odisha coast during the period.

Frequent extreme rain behind rising incidents of floods in 2016

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Nearly 150 events of extremely heavy rainfall of more than 200mm each, occurred during this year’s southwest monsoon between June and September, indicating the high frequency of such events, a post-monsoon report of India Meteorological Department (IMD) revealed. These extremely heavy rainfall events triggered large-scale flooding and flash floods across the country, killing hundreds across the country. India Meteorological Department’s (IMD) categorizes rainfall between 64.5mm and 124.4mm as heavy rain while rainfall between 124.5 mm and 244.4mm is categorized as very heavy rainfall. The extreme rainfall events were concentrated in Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, West Bengal, Madhya Pradesh, parts of Rajasthan, Konkan region and western Maharashtra. The trend of these events occurring in shorter durations is becoming more frequent and intense, leading to incidents such as the Mahad bridge collapse. In August this year, a colonial era bridge on the Mumbai-Goa bridge national highway collapsed as strong currents in Savitri river flowing beneath it shook its foundations and plunged two transport buses and private vehicles in it, killing over 20. This incident was triggered following intense downpour upstream in Mahabaleshwar, where Savitri river originates. In fact, the data that has come from IMD’s report shows that there were five extremely heavy rain events in the hill-town of Mahabaleshwar between July 29 and August 6. Meteorologists and weather scientists said that many recent studies have indicated that there has been a rise in heavy and extreme rain events in India and even globally. Anthropogenic climate change has been cited as one of the chief reasons behind this rising trend. “With rising temperatures, the water bearing capacity of atmosphere increases and more moisture is drawn from the oceans. The result is sudden precipitation and this phenomenon has been documented globally,” said KJ Ramesh, director-general, IMD.According to IMD’s analysis of rainfall data between 2009 and 2013, Odisha, Konkan, Goa, Coastal Karnataka, Assam, Meghalaya, Arunachal Pradesh, Kerala have all witnessed heavy rainfall days for more than 20 days during the monsoon season. Odisha, Konkan, Coastal Karnataka Sikkim, Assam and Meghalaya recorded an average of 70 heavy rainfall events in that period.“The seasonal monsoon data has also shown that the number of light to moderate rainfall days is declining since 1980’s, compared to the years before that,” added Ramesh.In its report, the IMD has also reflected on its monsoon forecast, that was off-mark. The IMD had predicted that the monsoon will be 106% or above-normal in the June-September period, but the actual monsoon turned out to be 97% or normal. “Prior to June, most of the climate forecasting models were indicating high probability for the development of La Niña during the second half of the monsoon season, which was supposed to favour normal to above normal rainfall over India.However, that did not happen,” the report said. The opposite of El Nino weather phenomenon wherein warmer than usual Pacific waters trigger droughts in South Asia, La Niña usually brings heavy rainfall in South Asia. The report added that with La Niña not developing against the expectation of global El Niño/ La Niña forecast and below normal rainfall during June and August, due to unfavorable phases of intra-seasonal activity, caused the most of the operational forecasts to overestimate to the actual rainfalls.

June ends with 11% rain deficit

In its first month, monsoon rainfall deficit in the country stands at 11 per cent below the long period average and the monsoon is now set to advance over Delhi-NCR, Haryana, Punjab and in the hill-states of Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand. This year, the monsoon arrived in Kerala on June 8, a week later than usual and the delay had a domino effect on its subsequent progress, Met officials said.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>As per the India Meteorological Department’s (IMD) extended fortnightly forecast, above normal rainfall is likely over north India during first week of July and over central India and western parts of the country during second week of July. The western coast, too, will receive above normal rainfall till July 10. In its second long-range forecast issued earlier this month, IMD had said that the monsoon will be bountiful in July at 107 per cent of the long-period average and even in the later months due to the La Nina weather phenomenon.Met officials said that the monsoon advanced in three phases since its onset. In the first phase, the it covered much of Kerala and the southern peninsula. In the second phase it covered parts of the western coast, up to Karwar.But, a lull in activity over the Arabian Sea halted the monsoon’s progress for a few days. Even as the Arabian Sea branch saw a lull, the Bay of Bengal branch brought significant rainfall to central India, Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh.”In the last week of June, monsoon picked up strength over the Arabian Sea and advanced speedily. Now, the conditions are favourable for monsoon’s advance over the remaining states,” said Sunitha Devi, director, weather section, IMD, Pune.According to IMD data, with 1213.8 mm rains, Goa has recorded maximum rainfall in June, followed by Sikkim, Arunachal Pradesh and Mizoram. The least rainfall has happened in Gujarat, which has recorded a mere 30mm rains. During the last week of June, the southwest monsoon advanced into south Gujarat, west Madhya Pradesh, east Uttar Pradesh and some parts of east Rajasthan.

Incessant rains lash Mumbai; heavy spells predicted in 48 hrs

Rains continued to lash Mumbai for the third consecutive day on Saturday, slightly disrupting suburban train services, even as the Met department predicted heavy showers over the next two days in Mumbai, Konkan and Goa region.The India Meteorological Department (IMD) has also issued a warning to fishermen not to venture into the sea in the wake of forecast. “This good and sustained spell of rain is thanks to the offshore trough formed over the Arabian Sea off Gujarat coast. There is also an upper air cyclonic circulation developing over south of Gujarat and north Konkan,” IMD Mumbai director VK Rajeev said.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Yesterday, the Colaba and Santa Cruz observatories in Mumbai recorded a rainfall of 26.8 mm and 50 mm respectively.The continuous downpour has affected the movement of local trains to some extent, as they are seen running at least 15 minutes behind their normal schedule, although no train cancellations have been reported so far.However, the downpour has not caused any major flight delays or cancellations.The incessant rains have brought down the temperature to an extent, with Colaba recording a minimum temperature of 25.8 degrees Celsius and Santa Cruz 24.2 degrees Celsius. PTI

Mumbaikars, heavy rainfall await you in the next few days

Mumbaikars hold on to your umbrellas tightly as what you are witnessing on Friday could simply be a start to heavy rainfall for next couple of days.Even as Mumbai is bracing itself with heavy rainfalls since morning Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) stated that there has been a forecast for ‘heavy to very heavy’ rainfall across Konkan and Goa and it includes Mumbai as well.”There are two reasons for this first there is a cyclonic circulation in the South Gujarat region and secondly there is a offshore trough running along Karnataka that is a typical of Monsoon and both these are likely to bring in good rains for the next couple of days,” pointed out K S Hosalikar, deputy director-general, IMD.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Speaking on the issue June so far being rain deficient for Mumbai, Hosalikar said that the monsoon is building up and with forecast of heavy rains the situation could change by the month end.On an average June receives 523mm of rains and with monsoon already delayed by 10 days there was already worry beginning to crop up. However, the rains that have picked up since Thursday and got only intense on Friday has brought a sigh of relief.EFFECT OF HEAVY RAINS ACROSS THE CITYThe Brihanmumbai Municiparl Corporation (BMC) released the following details:HIGH TIDEWarning of 4.42 m at 3pm and 1.58 m at 9:13pmRAINSModerate rains coupled with thunders for next 24 hoursWATER LOGGINGWater-logging was reported in Hindmata and Parel TT on Friday. 6 other areas in the city also reported water blockages, however, water-logging was cleared and traffic was restored. HOUSE/SLAB COLLAPSE – A part of a slab, supposed to be plaster at Mumbai’s KEM hospital collapsed. 2 nurses were injured in the incident; nurses are under observation and being treated. Their condition is stable. FIRE – Fire broke out at a rubber godown on Friday in Sewree. Fire was doused in an hour. 8 Fire engines were sent by Mumbai Fire Brigade and 2 fire engines were sent by Mumbai Port Trust. No casualty was reported. RAINS DELIGHT WEEKEND PLANSMeanwhile Mumbaikar witnessing the heavy rains have already begun planning for the weekend as places like Lonavala, Matheran, Bushi dam, Malshej Ghat will be thronged.”Since its has already been forecasted that there will be heavy rains along with friends we have planned trip to Matheran,” shared Anil Kubal a Goregaon resident.BMC disaster Management Cell too has been busy answering phone calls even as officials have asked for patrolling by cops as well as lifeguards along the sea facing areas.”Several people rush to enjoy rains at places like Marine drive, Bandstand, Carter Road and even beaches and in their frolic they forget the risk involved. Hence we have requested for our staff as well as police to keep patrolling such areas,” shared a BMC official.

Rain clouds are here..

The parched regions of Maharashtra have a reason to cheer. The monsoon’s surge is about to revive, ending the brief lull that had stalled its advance and got farmers worried. Weathermen from the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said that in the next two-three days, monsoon will advance over various parts of Maharashtra, starting with Konkan, Mumbai and then Marathwada and Vidarbha.”We have favourable weather systems developing over both Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. These conditions will make westerly winds stronger,” said KS Hosalikar, deputy director-general, IMD, western region.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>The Met department also said on Thursday that “conditions are once again becoming favourable for the advance of southwest monsoon over south Chhattisgarh and remaining parts of Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and some parts of Odisha, Gangetic West Bengal and Jharkhand.”Since its onset on June 8, the monsoon had made rapid progress in the next three days, advancing till Karwar on west coast and Ongole near coastal Andhra on the east coast. But, from June 12 onwards, weather conditions on the west coast weakened, worrying farmers and people of drought-hit regions of a further delay. “Things are improving now. A cyclonic circulation is set to form over west-central Bay of Bengal and it is likely to move towards the west, making conditions favourable for monsoon rainfall in Maharashtra,” said Sunitha Devi, director, weather section, IMD, Pune.Private weather forecaster Skymet, too, said that rains are set to pick up pace after next 24 hours. “The cyclonic circulation over Bay of Bengal will help in increasing the monsoon surge over the west coast and we expect that the intensity of rain will increase over Interior Maharashtra as well as the coastal areas of North Maharashtra including Mumbai by June 18,” said Skymet. They added, “Further, by June 20 and June 21, moderate to heavy rain and thundershowers are expected to lash Mumbai and nearby areas. This spell may mark the onset of much-awaited monsoon over Mumbai.”

High tech edge to monsoon forecast: Here’s why India is spending $60 million on a new supercomputer

India’s forecasting of the monsoon – the crop-nourishing seasonal rains that are the lifeblood for farmers in the country of 1.3 billion people – is getting a high-tech makeover.Jettisoning a statistical method introduced under British colonial rule in the 1920s, India’s meteorology office is spending $60 million on a new supercomputer to improve the accuracy of one of the world’s most vital weather forecasts in time for next year’s rains.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>The new system, based on a US model tweaked for India, requires immense computing power to generate three-dimensional models to help predict how the monsoon is likely to develop.Experts say better forecasting could help India raise its farm output by nearly 15%, by helping farmers tweak the best time to sow, irrigate or apply fertilizer to crops and if rains fail plan state-wide measures. This would be a major boon for a country already either the world’s biggest or second-biggest producer and consumer of rice, wheat, sugar and cotton.”If everything goes well, by 2017 we’ll make this dynamical model operational by replacing the statistical model,” said M. Rajeevan, the top scientist in the ministry of earth sciences, which oversees the weather office on a 30-acre campus in the heart of New Delhi.The June-September rains are relied on to replenish reservoirs, recharge aquifers and for half of all farmland that does not have irrigation.Many areas receive more than 70% of their annual rains during the monsoon and plentiful rains means more money in rural communities, sustaining some 600 million people and boosting demand for an array of goods and services.MELTING SNOWRajeevan declined to name the companies the bureau was talking to obtain the new supercomputer, but said it would be 10 times faster than the existing one supplied by IBM.The India Meteorological Department (IMD) issues forecasts for the country as a whole and five regions, though does not give separate ones for the country’s 29 states.”We didn’t adopt the dynamical model earlier because it was not able to forecast monsoons. Now, it can and with better results than the statistical model,” said Rajeevan.The existing model uses historical relationships between rainfall and six to eight predictors such as sea-surface temperatures and southeasterly winds over the Indian ocean.Because of India’s size, one national forecast is of little help to farmers spread across diverse climatic zones.”I’ll cherish the day they’ll come up with a forecast for my state. It’s going to mitigate our risks and help us plan our crop better,” said Dharmendra Kumar, whose farm is in Uttar Pradesh, a state roughly the size of the United Kingdom and with a bigger population than Brazil.The IMD, set up in 1875, produced its first monsoon forecast in 1886 after the famine of the 1870s.Back then, it relied on melting snow in the Himalayas to predict rains. Early forecasters also observed plants and animals, consulted almanacs and invoked Lord Indra, the rain God of Hindus.Now, about 5,000 IMD employees gather data, obtained from radar, observatories, ships, sensors and satellites, for the weather office, where staff peer at computer screens flickering with charts, graphs and multi-coloured maps of India.In 2015, the IMD accurately forecast a second straight drought year, in contrast to predictions of bountiful rains by Skymet, India’s only private forecaster.But the weather office failed to foresee the worst drought in nearly four decades in 2009 and, as this year’s monsoon starts, farmers hope its forecast of above-average rains will be right.”In the last one decade we’ve gained a greater degree of precision in forecasting rains, but monsoon still remains a very complex weather system which only God has the ability to understand fully,” Rajeevan said.

Much-awaited southwest monsoon likely to hit Kerala in next 2 days: IMD

The much-awaited southwest monsoon is expected to hit the Kerala coast in next two days.However, there is going to be “no significant” change in the temperatures in northwest India for the next five days, which is reeling under intense heat.”Conditions continue to remain favourable for the onset of southwest monsoon over Kerala in next 48 hours,” the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said on Monday.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>The IMD had earlier said that monsoon should hit the Kerala coast on June 7, with an error margin of plus or minus four days.The MeT department has also predicted “heavy to very heavy rains” in coastal Karnataka and Kerala, Arunachal Pradesh, south interior Karnataka and Lakshadweep.Thunderstorms accompanied with squall are very likely at isolated places over Telangana and north interior Karnataka.”Heavy to very heavy rains are also likely at isolated places over sub-Himalayan West Bengal, Sikkim, Assam, Meghalaya, Manipur, Mizoram and Tripura,” it said.However, heatwave conditions are “very likely” to prevail over isolated places in Rajasthan and west and east Madhya Pradesh, Punjab, Haryana, Chandigarh, Delhi, south Uttar Pradesh and Gujarat.

Heat wave causes over 300 deaths in Telangana this year: Official

As many as 315 heat wave-related deaths have been reported in Telangana since the beginning of the summer season till May 21, according to officials of the state Disaster Management department.”315 (heat wave-related) deaths were confirmed by the three-member committee. Nalgonda district recorded the highest death toll of 91,” an official in the Disaster Management department Control Room said.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Also Read: No relief from soaring temperature: IMD predicts another bout of extreme heat wave”There has been appreciable rise in maximum temperatures at one or two places over Telangana. The temperatures have been appreciably above normal at one or two places,” India Meteorological Department (MET) said in a bulletin.The highest maximum temperature of 46 degree Celsius was recorded at Ramagundam, the weatherman said.”Heat wave conditions are very likely to prevail at isolated places in Adilabad, Nizamabad, Karimnagar, Medak, Nalgonda, Warangal and Khammam districts of the state during next 72 hours (May 23-25),” it added.

North and West India reel under severe heat wave conditions

Several parts of north and west India continued to reel under severe heat wave conditions. On Thursday, the mercury soared to 48 °C in Ahmedabad, making it the “hottest day in the city in the last 100 years.”

“The maximum temperature in Ahmedabad city was recorded at 48 °C. It has broken a 100-year record. As per the data, the city had recorded 47.8 °C on 27 May, 1916,” said Jayanta Sarkar, director, India Meteorological Department (IMD).

Representational image. PTI

Representational image. PTI

Civic officials confirmed one death due to heat stroke in Ahmedabad taking the death toll to heat wave to four this summer and 32 heat-related patients were admitted to government hospitals. Severe heatwave condition continues to prevail across north Gujarat and Saurashtra-Kutch region.

“The severe heatwave condition will prevail till Friday before receding. Westerly wind is likely to bring some moisture which will reduce temperature and offer some respite,” Sarkar added.

Apart from Ahmedabad, Gandhinagar, and Deesa in Banaskantha district also recorded the maximum temperature of 48 °C.

Several other cities in Gujarat recorded over 45 °C temperature, including Kandla (47.7), Surendranagar (47.5), Idar (47.2), Amreli (46.8), and Rajkot 46 °C.

The heat wave condition in Haryana and Punjab was not too different. The maximum temperature was recorded at 46 °C in Hisar.

Ambala registered a maximum temperature of 41.1 °C, two degrees above normal, an IMD official said. Chandigarh, where the maximum temperature on Wednesday was 43.1 °C, recorded a high of 41.9 °C on Thursday, three notches above normal.

In Punjab, Amritsar’s maximum temperature dropped to 43.8 °C, four degrees above normal.

Ludhiana and Patiala also sizzled recording maximum temperatures of 43.5 °C and 42.5 °C respectively.

Haryana Education Minister Ram Bilas Sharma said that government schools in the state would remain closed from 23 May to 25 June. He also urged private schools to take similar steps.

There was no respite from the scorching heat in lower hilly regions of Himachal Pradesh as dry weather prevailed in the state with Una being the hottest place in the state at 43.4 °C.

Sunder Nagar and Bhuntar recorded a the maximum temperatures at 38 and 36.6 °C respectively, followed by 35.6 °C in Nahan, 33.6 °C in Dharamshala and 33 °C in Solan, Kalpa recorded 25.4 °C, the Met Department said.

Maximum temperature in Shimla settled at 29 °C with the state capital and its surrounding areas experiencing with partly cloudy skies and cool breeze during the day.

Keylong in the tribal Lahaul and Spiti district was the coldest at 8.8 °C.

According to the IMD forecast, dry weather conditions will prevail for the next six days with a marginal fluctuation in the mercury.

Meanwhile, Banda in Uttar Pradesh recorded a maximum temperature of 47.2 °C, highest in the state,  followed by Allahabad at 46.7 °C, the IMD said here. Lucknow recorded a maximum temperature of 44.4 °C.

Maximum temperatures in Jhansi was recorded at 46.4 °C, 46 °C in Orai.

Above normal temperature were also recorded in Allahabad and Faizabad divisions.

According to the IMD forecast, rain or thundershowers are very likely at isolated places over east UP, while weather is likely to remain dry over western part of the state.

“Taking soaring temperatures into account, the district administration has decided to close all the schools from 23 May,” said District Magistrate Raj Shekhar.

With inputs from PTI

High alert: Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh brace for heavy rains as IMD issues cyclone warning

The MET office has forecast heavy rains in parts of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu as the depression over southwest Bay of Bengal may intensify into a cyclone. The depression moved north-northwest and lay centred about 120 km south by southeast of Chennai, the India Meteorological Department said on Tuesday evening.

“The system is likely to move north northwestwards towards north Tamil Nadu, south Andhra Pradesh coast and further intensify into a deep depression during next 24 hours. The system is likely to be close to Chennai during morning hours of 18 May. It will move northwards and then recurve north northeastwards and may intensify into a cyclonic storm during subsequent 24 hours,” it said.

Strong winds with speed reaching 50 to 60 km per hour are likely along and off south and north coastal Andhra. Heavy rainfall will continue in Tamil Nadu and Puducherry during the next 24 hours, said the weather department on Wednesday.

It is expected to move north-northeastwards and intensify into a deep depression and further into a cyclonic storm over the next 48 hours. Rainfall is also predicted over south coastal and interior Tamil Nadu durning the next 24 hours.

IMD_IMD

Similarly, heavy rainfall is predicted over south Andhra Pradesh coast during the next 48 hours. According to the IMD, wind speed reaching 55-65 km per hour gusting to 75 km per hour would prevail along and off north Tamil Nadu and Puducherry during the next 24 hours and south Andhra Pradesh coast during next 48 hours.

Fishermen are advised not to venture into the sea as sea condition will be very rough during the next 48 hours. Meanwhile, the Tamil Nadu government has deputed senior officers to areas that may experience heavy rainfall to oversee precautionary measures.

The IMD advised fishermen not to venture into the sea as sea condition is likely to be rough along and off coastal Andhra, Puducherry and north Tamil Nadu.

The MET office has forecast heavy rain at isolated places in the districts of Krishna, Guntur, Prakasam and Nellore of coastal Andhra Pradesh and Chittoor, Anantapur, Kadapa and Kurnool of Rayalaseema on Thursday and Friday.

The MET department has warned of heavy rains in coastal and interior Tamil Nadu and Puducherry over the next 24 hours. It has also warned of heavy rainfall in isolated regions of south coastal Andhra Pradesh, Rayalaseema and coastal Karnataka over the next 48 hours.

Hyderabad Meteorological Centre has forecast thunderstorm accompanies with squalls at isolated places in Telangana till 21 May.

Meanwhile, there was appreciable rise in maximum temperatures at one or two places in Telangana.

Adilabad was the hottest place in the state with maximum temperature of 43.8 degrees Celsius. Ramagundam recorded 43 degrees Celsius.

The heat wave in Telangana has claimed 300 lives this season but rains over past few days significantly brought down the mercury.

Read the full statement on IMD here:

indian_1463558725 by Firstpost

With inputs from IANS

Monsoon delayed by six days, likely to arrive in Kerala on 7 June

New Delhi: The Met department on Sunday predicted a six-day delay in the onset of monsoon that was scheduled to strike Kerala on 1 June. The news comes as a disappointment to the drought-hit parts of the country.

“Forecast suggests that monsoon onset over Kerala this year is likely to be slightly delayed. The Southwest monsoon is likely to set over Kerala on 7 June with a model error of plus or minus four days,” the India Metereological Department (IMD) said in its forecast released here.

June 1 is the official onset date of monsoon in India when it hits Kerala.

The delay in the arrival of the monsoon is not good news for the country, which is suffering due to intense heat and is eagerly awaiting the rains. The government recently told the Supreme Court that about 330 million people, or nearly one fourth of the country’s population, in 256 districts have been affected by the drought. Many have also died due to sunstroke and dehydration.

ReutersReuters

Reuters

Interestingly, forecast of monsoon onset issued during the past 11 years (from 2005-2015) except 2015, has proved to be correct. This includes the error margin of plus or minus four days.

IMD Director General Laxman Singh Rathore said the delay in the monsoon onset was not an “unusual” phenomenon.

He, however, said that there would be some relief to South Indian states from the intense heat as there could be some rainfall in the coming days.

“Currently there is a low pressure area in the Bay of Bengal, which will become a depression and hit Tamil Nadu coast by tonight. This will bring good amount of rainfall to the state, parts of South Interior Karnataka and parts of Kerala,” Rathore said.

“…We cannot rule out the possibility of a depression forming in the Bay of Bengal which will help monsoon to set over south Andaman Sea around May 17 and over north Andaman Sea on May 20. This will cause increased rainfall activity in the southern peninsula,” S Pai, deputy director general (climate division), Pune IMD, has been quoted a saying in a report in The Indian Express.

Skymet, a private forecasting agency, in its forecast for monsoon onset, had said that monsoon will hit Kerala between 28 and 30 May.

The IMD has already made a forecast that monsoon will be “above normal” this year.

With PTI

Your wait for rain may stretch an extra week

The onset of southwest monsoon over Kerala is likely to be delayed almost by a week and it will arrive in the state only on June 7, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said on Sunday. However, it will not have any bearing on the rainfall over the entire season, officials said.The normal date of monsoon onset over Kerala is June 1. The IMD has used the statistical model, which has a model error margin of ± 4 days, for the forecast. Usually, the monsoon covers the southern peninsula and eastern coastal states by June 7-8 and arrives in Mumbai on June 10, progressing to cover the entire country by the first week of July.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>The IMD used six markers, comprising data on minimum temperatures over northwest India, pre-monsoon rainfall peak over the south peninsula and outgoing long-wave radiation over South China Sea, for the forecast.Conditions are becoming favourable for the onset of southwest monsoon over Nicobar Islands, south Andaman Sea and parts of south Bay of Bengal around May 17 and advancement over the entire Andaman Sea close to its normal date, the IMD said. Met department officials explained why the delayed monsoon will not have any bearing on the rainfall over the entire season.”There are several changes in the weather patterns during the transition from summer to monsoon. There are changes in temperatures, and, most crucially, wind patterns, which are the key to the strengthening of monsoon. A delayed onset has no correlation with monsoon’s performance. Last year, monsoon arrived on May 30 but it was deficient in the long run,” said BP Yadav, head, National Weather Forecasting Centre, IMD.”In the coming days, heat is not likely to increase and there is a possibility of dust storms and thunderstorms in north India, especially Delhi-NCR,” he said.Earlier in April, the IMD had forecast that the country would receive above-normal rainfall, quantitatively 106% of the long-period average with an error margin of ± 5.The country has witnessed two consecutive below-par monsoon seasons and currently over 25% of India’s population is reeling under drought. A positive forecast for the upcoming monsoon has increased the hope of an upswing in the economy.Last year, the El Niño weather phenomenon – marked by warmer-than-average sea-surface temperatures in Pacific Ocean – that causes droughts in South Asia was quite strong, leading to a 14.3% monsoon deficit in 2015.The weather phenomenon has also led to warmer-than- usual temperatures, and, as per IMD, January to April were the hottest on record. But El Niño is gradually on the decline and its opposite phenomenon, called La Nina, is likely to gain strength, inducing heavy rainfall in south Asia and North America, hurricanes and a drop in sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA, and Bureau of Meteorology, Australia, have both said La Nina is likely to follow El Nino.Monsoon onset forecasts and actual onsetYEAR FORECAST ONSET DATE ACTUAL ONSET DATE 2011 May 31 May 29 2012 June 1 June 5 2013 June 1 June 3 2014 June 5 June 6 2015 May 30 June 5

Monsoon delayed by six days, will hit Kerala on 7 June: Met dept

New Delhi: In unpleasant news for the heat-troubled country, the Met department on Sunday predicted a six-day delay in the onset of monsoon that was scheduled to strike Kerala on 1 June.

“Forecast suggests that monsoon onset over Kerala this year is likely to be slightly delayed. The Southwest monsoon is likely to set over Kerala on 7 June with a model error of plus or minus four days,” the India Metereological Department (IMD) said in its forecast released here.

1 June is the official onset date of monsoon in India when it hits Kerala.

The delay in the arrival of the monsoon is not good news for the country, which is suffering due to intense heat and is eagerly awaiting the rains.

ReutersReuters

Reuters

Interestingly, forecast of monsoon onset issued during the past 11 years (from 2005-2015) except 2015, has proved to be correct. This includes the error margin of plus or minus four days.

IMD Director General Laxman Singh Rathore said the delay in the monsoon onset was not an “unusual” phenomenon.

He, however, said that there would be some relief to South Indian states from the intense heat as there could be some rainfall in the coming days.

“Currently there is a low pressure area in the Bay of Bengal, which will become a depression and hit Tamil Nadu coast by tonight. This will bring good amount of rainfall to the state, parts of South Interior Karnataka and parts of Kerala,” Rathore said.

Skymet, a private forecasting agency, in its forecast for monsoon onset, had said that monsoon will hit Kerala between 28 and 30 May.

The IMD has already made a forecast that monsoon will be “above normal” this year.

Heat wave continues in Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, no let-up expected

Hyderabad: There was no let up in the heat wave gripping Telangana and Andhra Pradesh on Monday while the met office has issued a warning of severe heat wave conditions for both the states for next two days.

The Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) warned that severe heat wave to heat wave conditions will prevail in all 10 districts of Telangana till 27 April.

It has made a similar forecast for all four districts of Rayalaseema and six out of nine districts of coastal Andhra Pradesh.

The heat wave in both the states reeling under second successive drought has killed dozens of people, triggered drinking water scarcity and migration by farmers and agriculture labourers to towns.

“Severe heat wave to heat wave condition most likely to prevail over many parts in the districts of East Godavari, West Godavari, Krishna, Guntur, Prakasam and Nellore of coastal Andhra Pradesh and in the districts of Anantapur, Chittoor, Kadapa and Kurnool of Rayalaseema,” said the meteorological centre.

Representational image. PTIRepresentational image. PTI

Representational image. PTI

Khammam, Nalgonda and Ramagundam in Telangana sizzled at 45 degrees Celsius on Monday, while Badrachalam and Hanmkonda recorded 44 degrees.

Hyderabad is also in the grip of intense heat wave with mercury rising to 43 degrees Celsius. This is second time this month that the city recorded this temperature, the highest for April in over four decades. Mahabubnagar and Medak also recorded maximum temperature of 43 degrees.

Streets were deserted in many parts of the state, especially between 12 noon and 5 p.m. as hot winds forced people to remain indoors.

The state’s disaster management department remained silent on the number of deaths due to heat wave after confirming 66 deaths as on 2 April even as the unofficial reports say the harsh weather has claimed over 200 lives so far this season.

In the drought-hit Telangana, the children and the elderly were the worst-affected by the heat wave. Dozens of cases of sunstroke are being referred to government-run hospitals every day. The daily wage labourers, vendors, beggars and others living on the streets were the worst-hit.

Andhra Pradesh too had confirmed 45 deaths in the first week of April but since then the officials have not revised the toll.

The opposition parties in both the states claim that the governments are suppressing the deaths as they have to pay compensation to the families of the victims.

According to the met office, temple town of Tirupati in Rayalaseema and Jangamaheswarapuram in coastal Andhra recorded maximum temperature of 46 degree Celsius during last 24 hours. Nellore and Nandyal too sizzled at 45. It was 44 in Nandigama, Kadapa and Kurnool.

Severe heat wave conditions likely to prevail in Telangana

Hyderabad: Severe heat wave conditions are likely to prevail over isolated places in several districts of Telangana for the next five days, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said in Hyderabad on Friday.

Representational image. ReutersRepresentational image. Reuters

Representational image. Reuters

“Severe heat wave conditions are likely to prevail over isolated places in the districts of Adilabad, Nizamabad, Karimnagar, Medak and Nalgonda of Telangana and heat wave conditions (are) very likely to prevail at many places in all districts of Telangana for next 48 hours (22 and 23 April),” the IMD said in its heat wave warning for the next five days in the state.

Heat wave conditions are “very likely to prevail” over many places in all the districts of Telangana during April 24 and 25, but the heat wave conditions are expected to abate on April 26, it said.

In its summary of maximum temperatures, the IMD said the highest maximum temperature of 46 degrees Celsius was recorded at Ramagundam in Telangana.

The maximum temperatures were markedly above normal at one or two places in the state, it said.

Senior officials recently said 35 people lost their lives due to the heat wave conditions and the government had issued a directive to the officials to take precautionary and relief measures. The IMD has also been advising people on the prevailing heat conditions.

Water levels dip in key reservoirs, no relief till monsoon

In a troubling development, water storage availability in country’s 91 major reservoirs have dipped alarmingly, reports The Times of India. The situation in worse than last year and according to Central Water Commission (CWC), which monitors water availability, the available quantity is 67% of what was present in 2015. The decline is mainly attributed to poor monsoon in the country for the last two years consecutively. The water availability was only 23% of the total storage capacity just a week ago.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Of the 91 reservoirs, 37 have hydro-power facility. These reservoirs not only provide water but are often used for irrigation purpose. Currently, there is drought-like situation in many states of the country including Maharashtra. CWC monitors water level so that available resources can be equitably distributed. Although situation is grim currently, with IMD predicting a good monsoon, the condition is likely to improve in the next couple of months. Most of the reservoirs receive water during the June- September season. Out of 91, 31 are in south India, followed by 27 in the west, 15 and 12 in eastern and central India, respectively. Six reservoirs are located in north India.At present nearly 16 states have lesser water than last year. These include states like Gujarat, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Kerala, Punjab and West Bengal among others.

Watch: With the blazing heat, have your eggs on the rocks!

Scrambled.
Sunny Side Up.
Benedict.
Deviled.
Hard-boiled.
Soft-boiled.
Fried.
Poached.
Curried.

Not how you like your eggs? Omelette perhaps? Owing to the searing temperatures, there’s now a new omelette in town and its not available at any of your fancy restaurants. You must take the next bus to Telangana, find the closest rock, wait for the sun to rise, keep your mix ready and voila! Don’t believe us? Meet this woman in Telangana who’ll show you what’s hot!

Cautionary advice: Carry plenty of water and a hat.

Yes, it’s really so hot that you can cook your eggs on the road! The India Meteorological Department (IMD), recently said that India will experience an “above normal monsoon” but had little comfort to offer, saying that searing heat conditions will continue for the next few days. According to the IMD, the heat wave will continue in Haryana, Chandigarh, Delhi, Rajasthan, Bihar, Gangetic West Bengal, Odisha, Marathwada, Vidarbha, Telangana, Rayalaseema and Tamil Nadu.

According to the nationwide forecast by the IMD on Friday, the minimum temperatures have been markedly above normal at a few places over west Rajasthan, which means these were more than 5 degrees Celsius above season’s average. According to the Hyderabad Meteorological Centre, the maximum temperature at most places is likely to be between 40 and 45 degrees Celsius.

With inputs from Agencies

Tamil Nadu: Met Department issues 48 hour heatwave warning

A heatwave warning has been issued to Tamil Nadu by the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD). According to the IMD, parts of the state will see a heatwave and temperatures will remain between 37 and 41 degrees Celsius. The IMD weather forecast showed that on Friday the temperature in the state in certain areas hit 37.2 degrees Celsius in the afternoon.The heatwave warning by IMD applies particularly to Chennai, Nagapatiinam, Tiruvallur,Vellore, Kancheepuram, and Ramanadu. The Deccan Chronicle reports that Ramanadu district collector has said that the public has been warned about this and told to take precautions.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Meteorologist S Ramachandran has told the daily that the heatwave will continue till May 11 in the state with some light drizzles in some parts of the state. Southern parts of Tamil Nadu are expected to receive some rain during this period. Sea breeze will provide some respite in coastal areas of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu.
ALSO READ Here is how you can protect yourself from heat related ailmentsRamachandran told the daily that between May 11 and June 28, the state will remain hot and humid.

The hard reality: One good monsoon will not unmake two years of drought

Indians have hailed twin, almost identical predictions, about a bountiful monsoon this year after two successive years of deficient rainfall. It is as if the skies will open up with good fortune.

In essence, 106 per cent in 2016 could mean the highest rainfall since 1999 when the IMD had predicted 108 per cent of long period average. A good rainfall is necessary for the country’s farmers and therefore, in the long run, to contain inflation and sustain overall economic growth. It is also critical to fill up the country’s water reservoirs which stand severely depleted. But a good monsoon alone cannot be the panacea for India’s muted agricultural growth or to avert future water wars. We are hurtling towards a crisis which one good monsoon alone may not solve.

Representational imnage. ReutersRepresentational imnage. Reuters

Representational image. Reuters

First of all, let us understand that an above-average rainfall forecast does not essentially mean that rains would be bountiful all over the country and therefore bring relief uniformly. Remember, at least 10 of India’s 29 states are reeling under drought. Speaking to The Indian Express, the head of IMD’s Climate Services Division D Sivananda Pai has said that even in a year of excess rainfall, there can be pockets that experience drought. In a bad monsoon year, some areas may get good rain. Rainfall is not evenly distributed across regions. The IMD is yet to come out with a detailed forecast of rains region-wise. Skymet, on the other hand, has said Tamil Nadu, North Eastern states and parts of south interior Karnataka may receive less rain from June through September although overall the monsoon will be above average. A report from the State Bank of India noted that though there is no need of worry regarding below normal rainfall in North-East India, “this is a slight concern for Tamil Nadu as it holds a share of about 7 per cent of total rice production in the country.”

Also, even if monsoon rains are good overall, a heartening agricultural growth will come on a very low base of previous two years. Agri economist Ashok Gulati pointed out that though the above-normal forecast for rains this time is welcome news, the country is still far away from the average annual agricultural growth rate of 4 per cent.

“Agriculture growth rate was just 1.1 per cent last year and negative (-0.2 per cent) the year before. Due to good rains, it may be anywhere between 4-6 per cent this year but then, the three-year average will be well below the ideal 4 per cent number,” he said. He said agriculture must register at least half the rate of overall GDP growth in the economy — so if the economy is growing at 8 per cent on an average each year, agri growth should be around 4 per cent. This ideal ratio of agri GDP versus India’s GDP growth has hardly been achieved, with Gulati pointing out that when it was seen — in the 11th Five-Year Plan (FY08 to FY12) — it lead to a decline in poverty three times faster during 2004-11 than during 1993-2004.”

Madhavan Rajeevan, secretary in the ministry of earth sciences, tweeted yesterday:  Past data shows while poor monsoon affects agriculture severely, good monsoon don’t produce proportionate positive effect on agriculture.

And in this piece in The Economic Times, former Niti Ayog member N C Saxena has said drought cannot be blamed entirely on monsoon failure or on climate change; a flawed agricultural policy is a bigger causative factor in the collapse of farm and dairy production in semi-arid regions. The bottomline is that India’s agricultural GDP needs more than a good monsoon to reach its true potential.

Not just flawed policy on agriculture, India also needs to urgently address the alarming situation of water availability throughout the country. As of now, primary impact of water scarcity is on agriculture and therefore rural purchasing power, but soon this could start affecting industries and the overall economic growth.

The SBI report quoted earlier said because of deficient monsoon rains in last two years, the country’s foodgrains production declined to 252 million tonne and 253 million tonne in 2014-15 and 2015-16 respectively from a record production of 265 million tonne in 2013-14.

According to the latest government data, the 91 major water reservoirs of the country were filled to just a fourth (24 per cent) of their capacity at 3.92 BCM on 7 April, 2016. This compares very poorly with the level in the corresponding period a year ago, when the same 91 reservoirs were filled two-thirds (69 per cent) with water. The total storage capacity of these 91 reservoirs is 157.799 BCM which is about 62 per cent of the total storage capacity of 253.388 BCM which is estimated to have been created in the country.

Let us look at the country’s western region, where severe water crisis in Marathwada and other parts makes it to headlines almost every other day. Government data show there are 27 reservoirs which were filled to only 20 per cent or a fifth of their capacity at 5.52 BCM on 7 April, lower than the national average.

Water resources minister Uma Bharti said recently groundwater accounts for nearly two-thirds of India’s irrigation and 80 per cent of domestic water needs. She said her ministry’s focus will be on the adoption of a participatory approach to sustainable management of groundwater based on aquifer mapping. “In the first phase the heavily overdrawn areas of Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Telengana, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu are proposed to be mapped under the programme. The Central Government has set apart up a sum of Rs 6000 crs over the next five years to revitalise the GW sector,” she said in a statement.

That the water crisis is propelling India towards water wars is quite evident. According to Water: At what cost? released by Water Aid, India has the largest number of people, at nearly 76 million, who have no access to a safe water supply. This is 6 per cent of the country’s population. Most of those people are living on around £3 a day. If they have the opportunity to buy water from a tanker it can cost 1 rupee (£0.01) per litre, sometimes double if supplies are scarce. Poor management of water resources is the biggest problem holding India back from reaching all of its population with water supplies. Aquifers provide 85 per cent of drinking water, but levels are falling in 56 per cent of the country.

The SBI report raised a concern over poor monsoons across much of the country in both 2014 and 2015 having left dams and reservoirs with unusually low water levels. “The Government has taken a number of steps, like sending a water train, to relieve a parched region but we believe there are 3 industry categories namely, ‘Food Products and Beverages’, ‘Textiles’ and ‘Paper and Paper products’ will get affected most from this water crisis. Our internal estimate suggests that these 3 industry segments may push down IIP-Manufacturing growth by around 50-70 basis points”.

‘Above-normal’ monsoon: Here’s the basis for IMD’s positive forecast for rains

After droughts and heat waves across various regions, India has finally got some much-needed good news.

The Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) in a statement on Tuesday said that the country will receive “above normal” monsoon with a fair distribution of rainfall across major parts of country.

A weakening El Nino is one of the reasons behind the IMD forecast for an 'above normal' monsoon. AFP

A weakening El Nino is one of the reasons behind the IMD forecast for an ‘above normal’ monsoon. AFP

IMD Director General Laxman Singh Rathore said there are 94 percent chances of country receiving “normal to above normal” rainfall while there is only one percent probability of “deficient” rainfall.

The monsoon seasonal rainfall will be 106 percent of the Long Period Average (LPA) with a model error of plus or minus 5 percent. “Above normal” monsoon is between 104-110 percent of the LPA and anything beyond 110 percent of the LPA is considered as “excess”.

This positive forecast by the IMD is based on the following reasons:

Weakening of El Nino

El Nino is a phenomenon associated with the warming of waters of the central and east-central equatorial Pacific. This phenomenon has been linked with weakening of the monsoon rains and droughts in India.

Moreover, the El Ninos in 2014 and 2015 — considered to be among the strongest El Nino years — were held responsible for the successive drought years, according to The Hindu.

But the El Nino is going to weaken this year, according to IMD.

“The latest forecast from the Monsoon Mission Coupled Climate Model indicates that El Nino conditions to weaken to moderate to weak levels during the first half of the monsoon season and ENSO neutral conditions likely to get established thereafter (sic),” said the IMD statement.

Indian Ocean Dipole

This phenomenon causes the western Indian ocean to become warmer and then colder than the eastern part of the ocean, which pushed rain-bearing clouds over India.

The IMD statement said that “positive” conditions for this phenomenon were likely to be established during the middle of the monsoon season, according to forecast from the Monsoon Mission Coupled Climate Model.

La Nina

The La Nina, also known as the anti-El Nino, causes the cooling of waters in the equatorial Pacific. The report in The Hindu added that La Nina was expected to set in around September and is considered to be good for rainfall.

The IMD statement added that it is “carefully monitoring the sea surface conditions over the Pacific and the Indian oceans”.

You can read the full IMD statement here:

INDIA METEOROLOGICAL DEPARTMENT

(With inputs from PTI)

Heat waves, drought: Before the above normal monsoon, India needs to withstand this summer

With heat wave warnings issued and schools being closed due to extremely hot weather, ‘Indian summer’ might just get a new definition after 2016. The India Meteorological Department (IMD) offered a drop of hope on Tuesday, predicting that after two drought years, India will get six percent more-than-normal monsoon rains in 2016 with a probability of 94 percent.

Until that happens, India has to live through an extremely hot summer. Temperatures are soaring in several parts of the country. New Delhi on Wednesday recorded the minimum temperature at 23.2° Celsius, two notches above the season’s average, the Met Office said, and predicted the maximum temperature is likely to hover around 35° Celsius.

On Tuesday, the Met office in Hyderabad issued heat wave warning for Telangana over Wednesday and Thursday.

“Heat wave conditions very likely to prevail over some parts in the districts of Hyderabad, Nizamabad, Karimnagar, Rangareddy, Khammam and Nalgonda,” said YK Reddy, director in charge, Hyderabad meteorological centre.

The highest maximum temperature of 44° Celsius was recorded at Nalgonda and Ramagundam on Tuesday.

Bhadrachalam and Nizamabad districts recorded 43°C. The mercury was at 42°C in Adilabad, Khammam, Mahabubnagar and Medak.

Hyderabad recorded 41°C along with Hanamkonda.

Heat wave conditions have already claimed 66 lives in Telangana and 45 lives in neighbouring Andhra Pradesh this season.

Representational image. ReutersRepresentational image. Reuters

Representational image. Reuters

It’s not just the southern part of India that is seeing this extreme condition. The eastern part of the country too has been affected.

The sizzling heat wave sweeping Odisha for the last couple of days continued to cripple normal life on Tuesday, as the temperature hovered over 40° Celsius in most places in the state. On Monday, Bhubaneswar broke the city’s 30-year-old record when temperature rose to 45.7° Celsius – the highest ever temperature for the month of April, according to The Hindu.

The state government on Tuesday received reports of 24 deaths due to sunstroke, as 19 towns recorded temperatures over 40° Celsius.

While Titlagarh recorded the highest temperature of 44.5°C, Bhubaneswar on Tuesday recorded 42.9°C.

Bhubaneswar Met department director Sarat Chandra Sahu said the heat wave conditions would continue for at least one week more in many parts of the state. The government has closed schools till 20 April in view of the prevailing heat wave in the state.

Poll-bound West Bengal is also reeling under intense heat. Mercury soared to 40° Celsius in state capital Kolkata on Monday and Bankura is one of the districts experiencing a heat wave.

Polling for the second part of the first phase of Assembly polls was held on Monday and many voters stood in queues in extreme heat to exercise their right to franchise. The Indian Express reported that temperature in Bankura rose to 45.1°C, which was eight degrees above average. Asansol recorded 43°C and Burdwan recorded 42.5°C. Despite that, the voter turnout in West Medinipur district was 84.71 percent, in Bankura was 78.87 percent and in Burdwan was 75.12 percent, The Indian Express quoted Chief Electoral Officer of West Bengal, Sunil Gupta, as saying.

The BBC reported that many parts of interior India are dry because of the lack of monsoon last year, a result of El Nino. Hot air from these parts are making their way to Bhubaneshwar and Kolkata, coastal cities that would have otherwise benefited from the cool sea breezes off the Bay of Bengal,

Up north, Bundelkhand in Uttar Pradesh is witnessing a drought. The government said it will take all possible steps to ensure that there is no starvation death, a day after the Centre announced a relief of Rs 1,304 crore for the region.

“It is being ensured that no one dies there due to hunger under any circumstances and all measures are being taken for it…in case of death due to hunger, the district magistrate will be personally held responsible,” Relief Commissioner Ashok Kumar had said.

The core Heat Wave zone of Marathwada, Vidarbha and Madhya Maharashtra will see higher temperatures this summer. “There is also a high probability (76 percent) of maximum temperatures in the core HW zone during the 2016 hot weather season to be above normal,” the IMD said in a statement earlier this month, according to The Times Of India.

Weather experts concur that the only way India will get respite from this heat is when the monsoon arrives. Till then, the country has no option but to sweat it out.

With inputs from agencies

IMD ends India’s drought of hope, predicts above normal monsoon this year

Easing fears over farm and economic growth after two consecutive years of drought, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) on Tuesday predicted “above normal” monsoon this year.

“Monsoon rains will be above long-period average this year and the El Nino conditions will be seen diminishing by June and July,” IMD said, adding that it will come out with the second stage of prediction in June.

Releasing its monsoon forecast for the season, IMD Director General Laxman Singh Rathore said, “Monsoon will be 106 percent of the long period average (LPA). There is 94 percent probability that monsoon will be normal to excess this year. By and large, there will be fair distribution of monsoon across the country. But North-East India and South-East India, particularly Tamil Nadu, may get slightly less than normal rainfall.”

Representational image. Reuters

Representational image. Reuters

Drought-hit Marathwada is also likely to receive “good” rainfall, Rathore added.

Anything less than 90 percent of the LPA is termed as a “deficient” monsoon and 90-96 percent of the LPA is considered as “below normal”. Monsoon is considered as “normal” if the LPA is between 96-104 percent of the LPA.

“Above normal” monsoon is between 104-110 per cent of the LPA and anything beyond 110 per cent of the LPA is considered as “excess”.

Agriculture, which contributes 15 per cent to India’s GDP and employs about 60 per cent of the country’s population, is heavily dependent on the monsoon as only 40 per cent of the cultivable area is under irrigation.

Due to poor monsoon in 2015-16 crop year (July-June), 10 states have declared drought and the Centre has sanctioned relief package of about Rs 10,000 crore to help farmers.

The forecast, which comes after two straight years of drought – is likely to boost the farm sector, which has been weighed down by subdued agriculture output and falling farmers’ income.

Two back-to-back monsoon failures, 2015 being the hottest year on record, poor post-monsoon rain, an alarming depletion of reservoirs and a heat wave that’s forecast to continue and even intensify — all this has changed the country’s water economics drastically for farmers, households, businesses and hydropower.

Monsoon IMD

On Monday India’s only private weather forecaster Skymet, said that the annual monsoon rains are likely to be above average, snapping two straight years of drought that cut farm output and farmers’ income. The July to September monsoon delivers nearly 70 percent of annual rains and waters half of India’s farmlands that lack irrigation facilities.

Monsoon rains are expected to be 105 percent above a long-term average, with a 35 percent probability of above average rainfall, Skymet had said in a statement. The El Nino effect is likely to wane after monsoon hits the southern Kerala coast by the end of May, the statement said.

Southwest monsoon chartSouthwest monsoon chartEl Nino, or warming of sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific, can lead to scorching weather conditions across Asia and east Africa, but heavy rains and floods in South America.

India’s west coast and central parts will get good rains, Skymet said, bringing in relief for farmers and policy makers, who are struggling with droughts and severe water scarcity in some regions.

Above average monsoon rains play a key role in boosting demand for an array of consumer goods, as 70 percent of India’s 1.3 billion people live in villages.

Agriculture accounts for about 14 percent of India’s $2 trillion economy, Asia’s third-biggest, but it supports two-thirds of Indian’s population.

State-run India Meteorological Department is expected to issue its forecast for this year’s monsoon rains soon.

Separately, Farm Secretary Shobhana K Pattanayak said current climatic conditions indicate that El Nino is gradually fading and giving way to La Nina, indicating bountiful rains this year.

Do you think summer is already too hot to handle? It is only going to get hotter

While people are finding it difficult to cope with the heat, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) issued its first summer forecast earlier this month. According to the report, harsh summer is yet to begin.In its first ever summer forecast IMD has indicated how summer, that is April to June, is going to see severe heatwaves.Already heatwave condition has enveloped the eastern and central regions of India.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>What does the forecast say?According to IMD’s forecast, the Northwest and Central regions of India are expected to be warmer than normal, with the average temperature rising more than 1 degree Celsius. Even an average 1 degree rise in temperature could mean that there is an increasing trend in the frequency and duration of heatwaves in the country. The duration is said to go longer with significantly harsher intensity.
ALSO READ IMD forecasts a harsh, warmer than normal summer aheadIndia being divided into 36 meteorological sub-divisions, the report suggests that warmer than normal temperature should be expected in all of the subdivisions.This means, if North India has an average temperature of 38 degree Celsius, we can easily expect to boil at 39-42 degree Celsius.
ALSO READ In a first, IMD to issue ‘summer forecast’This is not all, the forecast also pointed out while we were waiting for the winters to arrive, January and February had seen temperatures which were above normal (1.5 degree Celsius and 2 degree Celsius respectively.)What are heatwaves?A heatwave is supposed to exist when the maximum temperature of a place exceeds its normal temperature by four to six degree Celsius. A heatwave can be accompanied by severe humidity, high temperatures at night, and many catastrophic-like conditions such as droughts which further causes loss of life.​Causes of heatwavesSo what causes the temperature to rise to almost 4 degrees Celsius above normal? There are a couple of things.
ALSO READ Odisha readies pioneering action plan to combat deadly summer heatFirstly, the entire trend of heatwaves is said to rise due to greenhouse gas emissions. It hold the heat in the atmosphere and hence your surrounding temperature is said to rise.The temperature of water in the oceans gives a rise to the humidity in the area and hence, the temperature is affected.That is not just all, El Nino is said to be one of the major reasons we are facing warmer summers. As per IMD records 1973, 1995, 1998, 2003 and 2010 saw harsh summers and were preceded by El Nino.Effects of heatwaves – Harsh summer, harsh realityIndia is facing one of the major droughts in Maharashtra currently. It does not end there, people are dying because of the Ganges drying up. Loss of life due to extensive heat is going upscale.Consider Bhubaneshwar, where on Monday the city was boiling at 45.8 degree Celsius. The city had not seen such a high temperature in 30 years now. The 2015 severe heatwave over Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, and neighbouring districts saw over 2500 people lose their lives.What to expect?Realistically, harsher summers and temperatures soaring higher than what they are currently is something we must prepare ourselves for. But, considering the decline of El Nino, government and other agencies expect a normal monsoon this year. This will be a sigh of relief for the water crisis in the country.We just need to wait till monsoon arrives.

Mumbaikars, brace up for hot and sweaty days

Even as the temperature in Mumbai came down on Thursday after spiking upto 38.2 degrees Celsius on Wednesday, the hottest day this summer so far, weathermen said that Mumbai will have to brace up for hot and sweaty days ahead.On Thursday, the maximum temperature at Santa Cruz was 33.5 degrees Celsius (humidity 60%), while at Colaba, it was 31.6 degrees Celsius (humidity 78%). In fact, the hottest day so far before Wednesday was on Sunday when the mercury level had touched 36.9 degrees Celsius.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>VK Rajeev, director of IMD, Mumbai, said, “The heat is the result of easterly winds from the land that results in increasing temperatures.””This week, particularly Wednesday, has been really hot and energy- sapping as temperatures seem to be soaring. Both Wednesday and Thursday were really hot and humid so much so that even playing Holi was not possible beyond a point,” complained Amit Rane, an Andheri resident.In fact, the situation across Maharashtra, too, seems to be worse as several places like Ahmednagar are reeling under 44.4 degrees Celsius this week and the heat wave is only going to continue in these regions.IMD officials said that while several areas of Marathwada and Vidharbha have started facing the heat wave already, Mumbai being a coastal city, the temperatures usually remain moderate during summer due to continuous flow of moist breeze from the sea, which is also the reason for the rising humidity.IMD officials said that March 28, 1956, has been the hottest day in March recorded so far, with a maximum temperature of 41.7 degrees Celsius. In March 2011, maximum temperature soared to 41.6 degrees Celsius, while in March 2015, it touched 40.8 degrees Celsius.

Pune, Mumbai, Thane witness sudden rains, citizens rejoice

Pune city witnessed rains on Friday morning. Though the weather bureau had predicted rains in parts of Maharashtra, citizens were caught by surprise when it started pouring. Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) has forecasted rain showers for Pune on Thursday, reports iamin.in. Maximum temperature would be around 33.9 degree Celsius and minimum temperature will be around 18 degree Celsius. Wind conditions will be calm and humidity levels will be around 81%.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Mumbai too witnessed cloudy skies in the morning.Mumbai and some other parts of Maharashtra experienced light rains, bringing down the mercury. Dadar, Worli, Mulund, Ghatkopar, Jogeshwari and Kandvli areas received light showers. Heavy showers were reported in adjoining Thane.Many parts of Marathwada also experienced unseasonal rains in last two days. In Mumbai, the India Meteorological Department yesterday recorded maximum temperature of 35.8 degrees Celsius in Santacruz and 33.4 degrees Celsius in Colaba.The minimum temperature in Santacruz was recorded at 23 degree Celsius and 24.2 degrees Celsius in Colaba.On Wednesday, the IMD had predicted light showers in Mumbai due to an increase in moisture across the western coastPune citizens took to social media to share images and videos of the rain. Raining in Pune…
Anil B. Ingle on Wednesday, March 2, 2016Posted by Avinash Waghmare on Thursday, March 3, 2016Posted by Akshit Rajput on Thursday, March 3, 2016 wonderful climate heavy rain @ pune expressway…
Sandeep MJ on Tuesday, March 1, 2016 Its raining here in pune
Mohit Ratnaparkhe on Wednesday, March 2, 2016A video posted by Nishij Jahagirdar (@nishij) on Feb 29, 2016 at 4:21am PST For more hyperlocal stories, visit iamin.in.

In a first, IMD to issue ‘summer forecast’

For the first time, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) will be issuing a full-scale summer forecast on the lines of its annual monsoon forecast, top-ranked officials in the Union ministry of earth sciences told dna. Officials also said that the country will witness a “severe summer” this year as it comes on the back of the strongest El-Nino in nearly two decades. The decision to issue a ‘summer forecast’ is part of the IMD’s larger plan to put out more information and special data for the public at large. Last month, dna had reported that IMD will be coming out with colour-coded warnings for forecasts.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>The country will see its first ‘summer forecast’ in March end. “We have decided to issue the summer forecast beginning this year. The forecast will give out information on how far above the temperatures will be in relation to the average temperatures. It (forecast) will give an outlook for the months of April, May and June which is categorised as the pre-monsoon season in meteorological terms,” said M Nair Rajeevan, secretary, Union ministry of earth sciences.While the annual monsoon forecast primarily gives an outlook of the southwest monsoon performance during the June-September period, the summer forecast will present the average temperatures during the April-June period along with IMD’s predictions. “We will indicate the average and forecasted temperatures for each region and later every five days we will put out a forecast for the next fortnight, known as extended range forecast,” Rajeevan added. The fortnightly predictions during summer will be graphically presented on the country’s map in a colour-coded format.In 2015, the country saw one of the worst heat waves in nearly two decades with 2,500 deaths recorded. Andhra Pradesh alone accounted for 1,735 deaths followed by neighbouring Telangana that recorded 585 deaths.Temperatures in 2015 summer were routinely six-seven degrees above normal in the range of 43-50 degree Celsius. “Even this year, we are going to witness a severe summer as it comes on the back of one of the strongest El-Nino. Although El-Nino will recede in a couple of months, occurrence of freak events such as hailstorms, unseasonal rains cannot be ruled out,” said Rajeevan.El Nino is a weather phenomenon wherein there is warming of central and eastern Pacific Ocean and it has been established that these conditions cause droughts in south Asia, extremely heavy rainfall in South America and other such extreme weather events in different parts of the world.In recent years, the IMD is using the dynamic model for forecasting weather systems as against the statistical model used in the past. To add to this, IMD is also equipped with more automatic weather stations, weather observatories, rain gauges and radars to make more specific forecasts down to block or tehsil level.

Erratic weather pattern likely in next 2 weeks: IMD

The next two weeks are expected to see an erratic weather pattern with the weatherman predicting revival of cold weather conditions due to western disturbance. The revival of cold weather is likely to give some respite to farmers. However, the overall temperature of the month is likely to remain above normal, it said.The next two weeks will witness erratic weather pattern, beginning with a drop in temperature, followed by a hike and then a drop again. Temperatures in several parts of North India slumped in the last two days.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>”This is because of Western Disturbance. The temperature will again rise in the next two days. But another Western Disturbance is likely to bring it down from January 18. This will continue till January 25 after which the mercury will rise again,” India Meteorological Department’s (IMD) Director General Laxman Singh Rathore said.Western Disturbance is the term used to describe an extra- tropical storm that brings sudden winter rain and snow to the northwestern parts of the Indian subcontinent. This is a non-monsoonal precipitation pattern driven by the Westerlies.”Low temperature is good for crops, especially for horticulture like apple, peach. As far as wheat is concerned, the current weather will definitely reduce the losses,” Rathore said. He said February may also see some rain showers.