Online news channel!

Tag: nobel

AIADMK appoints Jayalalithaa’s close confidante Sasikala as party General Secretary

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>All India Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (AIADMK) on Thursday adopted a resolution to work under leadership of Jayalalithaa’s close confidante VK Sasikala, who is also known as Chinnamma.The resolution was passed at the party’s general council meeting that is underway in Chennai.According to ANI, 14 resolutions were passed in AIADMK general body meeting, including one to confer late CM Jayalalithaa with the Magsaysay Award and the Nobel prize for World Peace.A resolution demanding Jayalalithaa’s birthday be celebrated as ‘National Farmers Day’ was also adopted in the meet.Top party leaders including party presidium E Madhusudhanan​ and Chief Minister O Panneerselvam, who is also the party treasurer were among the participants.
ALSO READ Wrong to nominate ‘Chinnamma’ as AIADMK gen secy, she tried to kill Jayalalithaa: Sasikala PushpaAfter the passing away of J Jayalalithaa on December 5, party cadres and top functionaries including Chief Minister O Panneerselvam had been urging Sasikala to assume the party’s top post of General Secretary and lead them.The venue of the meeting, Srivaru Venkatachalapathi Kalyana Mandapan sported life size hoardings of a smiling Jayalalithaa waving to party workers in the departed leader’s favourite green colour.Several leaders had also urged Sasikala to assume the mantle of both the party and governance as general secretary and Chief Minister respectively.On Wednesday, AIADMK cadres had allegedly attacked and injured the husband of expelled party MP Sasikala Pushpa, who was accused of trying to create a law-and-order problem ahead of the General Council meeting here.

Tagore Nobel theft: CID gets vital leads, another person detained

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>The CID has started combing operation at Bolpur in Birbhum district of West Bengal in connection with its probe into the theft of Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel Prize medal in 2004.After interrogation of baul singer Pradip Bauri, arrested for his alleged involvement in the theft of the Nobel Prize medal, the CID has detained Bolpur-resident Sanjay Hazra, a senior officer said.”Bauri has given us many leads including the name of this person. He was picked up from his residence in Bolpur this Friday and detained. We have already started questioning him,” the senior officer said.In fact, the CID has started “combing” Bolpur for those named by Bauri, he added.”We will also summon those who were earlier questioned by the CBI in connection with the investigation of the Nobel theft,” the IPS officer said. It was also learnt, that the CID has gathered finger prints of both Bauri and Hazra as part of their probe into the matter. Bauri was detained for nearly two weeks by the CBI during its investigation into the case.Bauri, who was the gram panchayat pradhan of Ruppur from 1998 to 2003, had allegedly given shelter to the culprits involved in stealing the medal and helped them flee the state. The CID has also got the name of a Bangladeshi national, Mohammed Hossain Shipul, supposedly the mastermind of the plot and two Europeans also involved in it. “We have planned for step by step approach to get hold of these people,” the officer said.West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee had said in August that if the state government was given the responsibility, it could try to retrieve the Nobel medallion stolen from a museum of Visva Bharati University.The SIT formed thereafter consists of Kolkata Police Commissioner Rajiv Kumar, ADG of Criminal Investigation Department (CID) Rajesh Kumar and IG of CID (II) Javed Shamim.The Nobel medal and the citation, bestowed to Tagore in 1913, were stolen from Visva Bharati University’s museum. The CBI had taken over the case soon after, but failed to recover it and closed the case in 2007. However, under political pressure, the case was reopened in 2008 and closed again in 2009.

Delhi’s Jamia Millia teaching Bob Dylan’s songs as literature long before Nobel recognition

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Literature and music enthusiasts across the globe might be debating the Nobel Prize for Literature awarded to iconic musician Bob Dylan but students at Jamia Millia Islamia have been studying his songs as poems in literature curriculum since 2011.The 75-year-old American singer-songwriter was chosen for the coveted award last month for “having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”, sparking off a debate whether songs qualify as literature or not. However, Dylan’s songs have been taught as literature in Jamia long before he was chosen for the prize. The varsity introduced Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the wind” in its MA English programme in 2011 as part of the poetry paper “From the Victorian Age to Contemporary Times”, a compulsory subject for those studying English literature.Other poets that are taught along with Dylan include Robert Browning, Ted Hughes and Dylan Thomas. “Students respond interestingly to Bob Dylan’s literature. Around 40 students are currently studying the course that is taught in the third semester of the MA English programme. We have been teaching how Dylan’s songs were used almost as anthems during the American Civil Rights movement in the 60s,” a faculty member of Jamia’s English department said. “However, with Dylan becoming the first musician to bag the Nobel Prize for literature we are hoping that more students from from other disciplines will opt for the course under the Choice Based Credit System (CBCS),” he added.Jamia, however, is not the only university to be teaching Dylan’s work as literature. Kolkata’s Jadavpur University also has some of his songs in the undergraduate curriculum. According to the Swedish Academy’s permanent secretary, Sara Danius, while Dylan performs his poetry in the form of songs, that’s no different from the ancient Greeks, whose works were often performed to music, a “great majority” on the 18-member jury panel had voted for him.

Fresh lead in Tagore’s Nobel Prize stolen case, one person arrested

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Twelve years after Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel Prize was stolen, police reveal that they have fresh leads in connection to the theft. On November 12, Pardip Bauri, a baul singer (folk artist) was arrested from a village in Bengal’s Birbhum district by the West Bengal Police. With this, police has reasons to suspect that this arrested folk artist has strong connections with the theft. However, so far, the investigating officers have not divulged more on him. Sources in police reveal that a court’s order has been recently issued, allowing Bauri to undergo Narco Ananlysis Test in Gujarat. Tagore won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1913. The Nobel Prize and the citation were stolen from the museum of Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan on March 25, 2004. The museum, which is a part of the University was founded by Tagore in 1921 was closed on the day of the theft. Along with the medal, Tagore’s gold pocket watch, his wife Mrinalini Devi’s gold bangle and antique Baluchari saree, his father Debendranath Tagore’s gold ring, several silver articles, rare paintings besides other awards, and certificates conferred on him were also stolen. In 2005, the Nobel foundation handed over two replicas of the Nobel Prize to Vishwa Bharati University.The case was immediately taken up by the state’s investigating agency – Criminal Investigation Department (CID), later to be handed over to the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI). After six years of investigation, which drew to a blank, the CBI submitted in the court in 2010 that they have stopped the investigation and closed the case with no headway into the case. When Trinamool Congress supremo, Mamata Banerjee began her second innings as the Chief Minister of West Bengal, she expressed her wish to bring back the Nobel prize. In August this year, the state government here in Bengal got a clearance from the Centre and immediately, a Special Investigation Team, headed by an Inspector General-rank officer was constituted.Sources in the investigating agency reveal that they have fresh leads into the case.

Indo-Japan nuclear-deal similar to agreement signed with US: Govt

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>The recently-signed India-Japan nuclear agreement includes reprocessing consent and a termination clause similar to the one in the Indo-US atomic deal, the government told Parliament on Wednesday. Making a suo motu statement in both Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha on the recent visit of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Japan, Minister of State for External Affairs MJ Akbar said the agreement is the first of its kind that Japan has signed with a non-signatory to the NPT. In Rajya Sabha, Akbar could not read out the statement due to ruckus created by the Opposition. He then laid the statement on the table of the House.”The agreement underlines international recognition of India’s responsible record. It has taken six years of negotiations and is the product of work spanning two Governments. The basic features are similar to those of civil nuclear cooperation agreement we have concluded with other partners and include reprocessing consent and administrative arrangements,” the minister said. “It has a termination clause that is not new and is in fact almost identical to the provision in the US Agreement,” Akbar said.The Agreement, he said, also focuses more heavily on modern safety in the light of Japan’s experiences 2011, which witnessed radioactive leak from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The minister noted that 10 agreements covering diverse fields of engagement were signed during Modi’s November 11-12 visit. During the talks with Modi, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe asked Pakistan to bring to justice the perpetrators of terrorist attacks, including November 2008 Mumbai attack and 2016 Pathankot attack.He said the two countries also agreed on a Manufacturing Skill Transfer Promotion Programme. “It is first of a kind arrangement in India, which is aimed at bridging a skill gap in high tech manufacturing in India. Under this programme, Japan-India Institute of Manufacturing (JIM) will be set up to train 30,000 Indian youth over 10 years in floor shop engineering skills,” Akbar said. He said the Japanese endowment courses will be instituted in select engineering and technology colleges of India.”This skill development programme could be an effective game-changer in augmenting manufacturing in India. It would also help to better integrate India in global supply chains. “One area which was of importance is joint projects in stem cell using iPS technology of Nobel Laureate Prof. Yamanaka, which holds promise for treating genetic disorders prevalent in Indian tribal belts,” Akbar added.

Kolkata’s money lending ‘Kabuliwalas’ struggle to cope after demonetization

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>The Kabuliwalas in West Bengal have traditionally played the role of money lenders in the community, giving out small loans in times of crisis. However, they themselves are in crisis these days.In the 19th century, these Afghan migrants popularly known as ‘Kabuliwalas’, came to the eastern Indian city of Kolkata from Pashtunistan, the modern day Afghanistan-Pakistan, in search of greener pastures. They would go from from door to door selling attar (perfume), dry fruits, spices and fabrics procured from Afghanistan. Over the years, they became money lenders and would charge high interest rates. Still, Bengalis have a special place in their hearts for them because of Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore’s endearing 1892 story about the friendship between a Kabuliwala and a five-year-old girl Mini. This story comes alive every time someone calls out, ‘Kabuliwala’ in the bylanes of the city. It might be a foreign land for him, but Nidim Khan, a third-generation Afghan money lender, says he feels at home in Kolkata. He, and several other Kabuliwalas have settled in the northern part of Kolkata and their building is famously known as the ‘Khan Kothi’. With minimal furniture and a beautiful carpet brought from Afghanistan, the house is neat and tidy. Nidim, a 28-year-old Afghan, who was born in Kabul, moved to Kolkata with his father a decade ago. Since then, he has been assisting his father in the business of money lending. But following the demonetization, he says they are trapped in a situation where they cannot recover the money they had lent or give out more money as loans to people. “We are not being able to recover the money as the people who had borrowed from us are repaying in old currency notes, which we cannot accept. People do not have enough Rs 100 notes or the new Rs 2,000 notes,” says Nidim adding, “They are asking for more time to repay their loan. On the other hand, we do not have new currency notes to give away as loans.”The Kabuliwalas do not hold bank accounts, which prevents them from exchanging old currency notes with them. “Since we are not Indian citizens, we do not hold any bank accounts. The currency notes in our possession are of no use to us as we cannot exchange them. We do not deal in bonds and agreements. Our business thrives on just promise and trust,” says Nidim’s father, Afroz who has been in the business of money lending for the past two decades in Kolkata. “While our income has dropped in the last few years, we have also had to reduce our interest rates from 10% to 5-6% flat. While we have been struggling with bad debts due to non-payment, the demonetization has hit our business harder,” added Afroz.

Swedish Academy says Bob Dylan won’t attend Nobel prize ceremony | Reuters

Swedish Academy says Bob Dylan won’t attend Nobel prize ceremony | Reuters

Updated: Nov 16, 2016 22:18 IST

‘);
FB.XFBML.parse();
*/
});

STOCKHOLM American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature last month, has decided not to attend the award ceremony in Stockholm, the Swedish Academy said on Wednesday.The notoriously media-shy Dylan said three weeks ago he would accept the 8 million crown ($870,000) prize, after repeated attempts by the award-giving academy to contact him since it named him as the winner on Oct. 13.The Academy said on its website that it had received a letter from Dylan explaining that due to “pre-existing commitments” he was unable to travel to Stockholm in December.”We look forward to Bob Dylan’s Nobel Lecture, which he must give – it is the only requirement – within six months counting from December 10,” it said in a statement, adding that it would provide additional information on Friday Nov. 18.

The lecture need not be delivered in Stockholm. When British novelist Doris Lessing was awarded the Nobel literature prize in 2007, she composed a lecture and sent it to her Swedish publisher, who read it out at a ceremony in the Swedish capital.Other Nobel Prize winners who have not attended the prize ceremony include Britain’s Harold Pinter and Elfriede Jelinek of Austria.

The ceremony is planned to be held on Dec. 10.

($1 = 9.1957 Swedish crowns) (Reporting by Helena Soderpalm; Editing by Mark Trevelyan)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

First Published On : Nov 16, 2016 22:18 IST

India’s efforts to protect children fail due lack of budget – Kailash Satyarthi | Reuters

By Nita Bhalla

NEW DELHI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – India’s efforts to improve the lives of its children are failing due to meagre government spending on the youth, Nobel peace laureate and child rights activist Kailash Satyarthi said on Monday, as the country marked its annual “Children’s Day”.Children’s Day, or Bal Divas, coinciding with the birthday of India’s first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, is marked by events such as cultural performances in schools.”Our nation has the world’s highest number of malnourished children, child labour and children vulnerable to sexual offences, (yet) it is unfortunate this section of the society receives the lowest budgetary allocation,” Satyarthi said.”All our efforts for the development of children fail with such disproportionate investment,” he said in a statement.Children make up more than 40 percent of India’s almost 1.3 billion population, yet only four percent of the budget is allocated to under-18s, he said.India has made considerable progress in curbing the exploitation of children over the last decade. It has introduced laws to protect children and ensure their schooling, as well as a range of social welfare schemes. But activists say implementation is lacking in combating issues such as child labour and sexual exploitation.

A February 2015 report by the International Labour Organization puts the number of child workers in India aged between five and 17 at 5.7 million, out of 168 million globally.More than half are in agriculture, toiling in cotton, sugarcane and rice paddy fields where they are often exposed to pesticides and risk injury from sharp tools and heavy equipment.Over a quarter work in manufacturing – confined to poorly lit, barely ventilated rooms in slums, embroidering clothes, weaving carpets, making matchsticks or rolling beedi cigarettes.

Children also work in restaurants and hotels, washing dishes and chopping vegetables, or in middle-class homes, cleaning and scrubbing floors.Other crimes against children are also a serious concern, say activists. There were over 94,000 crimes against children recorded in 2015, an increase of more than five percent from the previous year, according to the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB).Crimes included murder, infanticide, kidnapping and abduction, abandonment and procuration of minor girls. Almost 30 percent were sexual offences, including rape, said NCRB data.

Satyarthi, whose charity Bachpan Bachao Andolan (Save the Childhood Movement) is credited with rescuing more than 80,000 enslaved children, said a child goes missing in India every eight minutes. He appealed to legislators across all political parties to devote one day to the discussion of child rights during the last session of parliament this year, which begins on Wednesday.”Although significant progress has been made for the protection of child rights, critical challenges continue due to gaps in policy and their implementation,” he said.”The fight against child labour, child trafficking and child sexual abuse need higher political will,” added Satyarthi, who won the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize jointly with Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai. (Reporting by Nita Bhalla, editing by Ros Russell; Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women’s rights, trafficking, corruption and climate change. Visit news.trust.org)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

First Published On : Nov 14, 2016 22:28 IST

Rs 500, Rs 1,000 ban: Move to curb black money will break back of traffickers, says Kailash Satyarthi

New Delhi: Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi has welcomed India’s overnight move to withdraw 500 and 1,000 rupee notes from circulation to crack down on corruption and counterfeit currency, saying it would also to help curb human trafficking and child slavery.

The shock currency move, announced late on Tuesday by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, aims to bring billions of dollars worth of unaccounted wealth which people are hoarding, or “black money”, into the mainstream economy and curb corruption.

Kailash Satyarthi. ReutersKailash Satyarthi. Reuters

Kailash Satyarthi. Reuters

From midnight on Tuesday, the highest denomination bank notes ceased to be legal tender for transactions other than exchanging them at banks for smaller notes.

Banks are meant to alert the Reserve Bank of India and tax authorities of any unusually large sums being exchanged – which may be the product of ill-gotten gains.

Child rights activist Satyarthi said human trafficking and child labor were amongst the largest sources of black money.

“I commend the boldness of the step taken by Prime Minister Narendra Modi to put an end to black money and corruption,” he said in a statement on late on Wednesday.

“Every single rupee earned by the traffickers and slave masters is black money. This move will break their backbone.”

India alone is home 40 percent of the world’s estimated 45.8 million slaves, according to a 2016 global slavery index published by the Australia-based Walk Free Foundation.

Thousands of children, mostly from poor rural areas, are taken to cities every year by gangs who sell them into bonded labor or hire them out to unscrupulous employers.

Many end up as domestic workers or laborers in brick kilns, roadside restaurants or small textile and embroidery workshops. Many women and girls are sold into brothels.

Modi came to office in 2014 promising a war against the shadow economy, winning him support from middle-class Indians who accuse politicians and businessmen of cheating the system.

The abolition of 500 and 1,000-rupee notes came with virtually no warning. The old notes will be replaced with new ones in a move which is also designed to stop anti-India militants suspected of using fake notes to fund operations

Satyarthi, whose charity Bachpan Bachao Andolan (Save the Childhood Movement) is credited with rescuing more than 80,000 enslaved children, said billions of illicit dollars was being made from the buying and selling of children.

“I have come across innumerable incidents where the agent or middle man earned at least 5,000 rupees ($75) for the placement of young boys in bonded labor and in cases of girls sold for prostitution and child marriages, this amount was around 200,000 rupees ($3,000),” he said.

“This announcement will go a long way in fighting exploitation of children and corruption in an organized manner. It is a positive step towards creating a more prosperous India for the future generations,” added Satyarthi, who won the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize jointly with Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousefzai.

India’s move to curb ‘black money’ will break backbone of traffickers : Satyarthi | Reuters

By Nita Bhalla

NEW DELHI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi has welcomed India’s overnight move to withdraw 500 and 1,000 rupee notes from circulation to crack down on corruption and counterfeit currency, saying it would also to help curb human trafficking and child slavery.The shock currency move, announced late on Tuesday by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, aims to bring billions of dollars worth of unaccounted wealth which people are hoarding, or “black money”, into the mainstream economy and curb corruption.From midnight on Tuesday, the highest denomination bank notes ceased to be legal tender for transactions other than exchanging them at banks for smaller notes. Banks are meant to alert the Reserve Bank of India and tax authorities of any unusually large sums being exchanged – which may be the product of ill-gotten gains.Child rights activist Satyarthi said human trafficking and child labour were amongst the largest sources of black money. “I commend the boldness of the step taken by Prime Minister Narendra Modi to put an end to black money and corruption,” he said in a statement on late on Wednesday.

“Every single rupee earned by the traffickers and slave masters is black money. This move will break their backbone.”India alone is home 40 percent of the world’s estimated 45.8 million slaves, according to a 2016 global slavery index published by the Australia-based Walk Free Foundation.Thousands of children, mostly from poor rural areas, are taken to cities every year by gangs who sell them into bonded labour or hire them out to unscrupulous employers.

Many end up as domestic workers or labourers in brick kilns, roadside restaurants or small textile and embroidery workshops. Many women and girls are sold into brothels.Modi came to office in 2014 promising a war against the shadow economy, winning him support from middle-class Indians who accuse politicians and businessmen of cheating the system. The abolition of 500- and 1,000-rupee notes came with virtually no warning. The old notes will be replaced with new ones in a move which is also designed to stop anti-India militants suspected of using fake notes to fund operations.

Satyarthi, whose charity Bachpan Bachao Andolan (Save the Childhood Movement) is credited with rescuing more than 80,000 enslaved children, said billions of illicit dollars was being made from the buying and selling of children.”I have come across innumerable incidents where the agent or middle man earned at least 5,000 rupees ($75) for the placement of young boys in bonded labour and in cases of girls sold for prostitution and child marriages, this amount was around 200,000 rupees ($3,000),” he said.”This announcement will go a long way in fighting exploitation of children and corruption in an organised manner. It is a positive step towards creating a more prosperous India for the future generations,” added Satyarthi, who won the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize jointly with Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousefzai. (Reporting by Nita Bhalla. Editing by Katie Nguyen. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women’s rights, trafficking, corruption and climate change. Visit news.trust.org)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Six Nobel laureates to attend Vibrant Gujarat Summit 2017

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Six Nobel laureates, including Indian-origin structural biologist Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, have agreed to be part of the Vibrant Gujarat Summit in January next year. American Nobel prize-winning scientist Harold E Varmus, American physical chemist and chemical physicist William Esco Moerner, American cell biologist Randy Wayne Schekman, Israeli crystallographer Ada E Yonath and American theoretical physicist David Jonathan Gross are the other Nobel-winning scientists who would be present at the biennial event. Ramakrishnan shared the Nobel in chemistry with Thomas A Steitz in 2009.The laureates would be part of the Nobel Prize Series Exhibition and Nobel Laureate Symposium which are happening for the first time in India at Vibrant Gujarat summit, an official statement said. The symposium is to be attended by the Prime Minister Narendra Modi on January 10, 2017, at Gandhinagar.Under the programme, Nobel laureates will engage with students on new ideas in science and will hold conference, lectures and roundtables. Besides the conference and meeting events, Nobel prize series will feature a 5-week long exhibition at Gujarat Science City in Ahmedabad.

Lakshmi, the wealth trinity, and Diwali

<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Ask any Hindu family about the key observance of Diwali and they will tell you that it is Lakshmi Puja. Amongst the trader communities, the Gujaratis tend to do this puja on Dhanteras while Marwaris observe it on Diwali. The objective is the same: To invite Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, who sits on her lotus and bestows prosperity.People however often forget that Lakshmi is part of a trinity though, viz Lakshmi, Saraswati, and Kali. In the world of wealth too, there exists a holy trinity, which we call the sacred trinity of Risk, Return, and Time. Te reality is that you ignore this at your own peril. If you truly wish to move up in the hierarchy of the wealthy, then it is this trinity that could possibly help you.Lakshmi, Saraswati, and Kali preach pretty much the same thing as Risk, Return and Time. In the world of finance, risk is usually measured as the degree of uncertainty in an expected outcome. Risk is the possibility of losing some, or all, of the original investment. Investing smartly is more about knowing the risks than the returns. It’s entirely your responsibility to figure out what kind of risk each investment entails, and whether you’re willing to take it on. You need to examine an investment opportunity before you take the plunge. This is also what Saraswati, the goddess of knowledge and learning, is all about.According to Hindu mythology, Lakshmi is fickle, always curious about Saraswati’s whereabouts and follows her around. Similarly, reward is inherently tied up with risk. That’s precisely what Lakshmi and Saraswati are telling us. Study your investment risks to yield better returns.Where does this leave the third element, time? The wealthiest of people did not build their fortunes overnight. American money-advisor, Dave Ramsey says that, ‘building wealth is a marathon, not a sprint.’ In fact, Anthony Samuelson, the Nobel Prize winning economist said, ‘Investing should be more like watching paint dry or watching grass grow. If you want excitement, take $800 and go to Las Vegas.’ Historically, some of the worst short-term market losses have given way to substantial market recovery. One always needs to remember that time in the market is much more important than timing the market.Kali is the feminine form of the noun kaala—the one who is time. We visualize Kali as the goddess of death in her fiery form but what is death if not the end of time for a person? In that sense, Kali is symbolic of time. She is also symbolic of transformation (think getting out of an investment after it has played itselfout).Remember one thing though. Lakshmi and Saraswati are like quarrelling sisters. Lakshmi jealously follows Saraswati so that Saraswati may not get the better of her. Unfortunately, Saraswati tends to leave owing to the friction that is created by the arrival of Lakshmi on the scene. In effect, we tend to throw caution to the winds when we’ve made handsome returns. The only one who can keep the two sisters united at the same place and at the same time is Ganesha. That Ganesha is you.(Best-selling author Ashwin Sanghi and serial entrepreneur Sunil Dalal are co-authors of 13 steps to Bloody Good Wealth, published by Westland in October 2016)

India, Myanmar sign three agreements in sectors of power, banking and insurance

New Delhi: India and Myanmar on Wednesday signed three agreements following delegation-level talks headed by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the southeast Asian nation’s State Counsellor and Foreign Minister Aung San Suu Kyi.

“#IndiaMyanmar: Partners in Progress – The two leaders witness exchange of agreements in sectors of power, banking and insurance,” External Affairs Ministry spokesperson Vikas Swarup tweeted.

One memorandum of understanding (MoU) was signed on cooperation in the power sector.

A second MoU was signed on banking supervision between the Reserve Bank of India and the Central Bank of Myanmar while a third MoU was inked for designing an academic and professional building programme for the insurance industry of Myanmar.

Suu Kyi met Modi on the third and concluding day of her state visit to India.

On Tuesday, she met President Pranab Mukherjee and External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj.

Though Suu Kyi is not the President as Myanmar’s constitution bars her from this post, the Nobel peace laureate is effectively the de facto ruler of the country.

This is the first official visit of Suu Kyi to New Delhi since her National League for Democracy (NLD) assumed power in Myanmar in March this year.

Prior to reaching New Delhi on Monday for the state visit, she attended the BRICS-Bimstec Outreach Summit in Goa on Sunday.

Her visit comes after Myanmar President U Htin Kyaw’s visit to India in August this year.

Bob Dylan, the Nobel Literature Prize-winning genius: Pianist Anil Srinivasan writes an ode

Bob Dylan. Wikimedia CommonsBob Dylan. Wikimedia Commons

Bob Dylan. Wikimedia Commons

I will tell you why you make me cry. The first time I experienced heartbreak I was too ashamed to confide in anyone. I was lonely. And she was still the only person I could talk to. It was my first taste of irony. On a long walk afterwards, those many sunsets ago, you taught me to sing, and I woke up to a jingle jangle morning. In a time where broken dreams were drowned in cups of tea and conversation, your poetry made me still, and find the music of my heart.

The wind howls like a hammer
The night blows cold and rainy
My love she’s like some raven
At my window with a broken wing.
(from Love Minus Zero, No Limit)

Disillusioned by my first taste of a big city job and feeling worthless, I remember searching for Cat Stevens in my suitcase. Someone called me a quitter and I don’t know if I’ve felt rawer than that. My suitcase rummaging brought your cassette up instead. And here is what you told me…

Im ready to go anywhere/I’m ready for to fade
Into my own parade, cast your dancing spell my way
I promise to go under it.

(From Tambourine Man)

I forgot about you after that. There would be parties where the midnight quiet meant someone picking up a guitar and playing your song. And then everything would stand still. I would become untwisted. And would hold your words around me like a blanket against the cold.

Though I know that evening’s empire
Has returned into sand
Vanished from my hand
Left me blindly here to stand but still not sleeping
My weariness amazes me I’m branded on my feet
I have no one to meet
And the ancient empty streets too dead for dreaming.
(From Tambourine Man)

When I left for America I was still clueless. As are many others like me who come to your world from mine. I found that tentative life exciting and terrifying. Streets were symmetrical and people smiled politely. I didn’t understand how anything worked. In my first month in Los Angeles, I remember being drawn to a street musician playing these words. The air around me changed and your words held me tight again.

How does it feel, how does it feel?
To be on your own, with no direction home
A complete unknown, like a rolling stone. ( From ‘Like A Rolling Stone’)

I’m now entering what we fashionably call “early mid life”. I’m as clueless as before except I show it less. The world has changed so much and it gets madder and noisier. There is no rationale to many things that happen. You’ve got this covered too.

The line it is drawn/ the curse it is cast
The slow one now /will later be fast
As the present now / will later be past
The order is rapidly fadin’

(From ‘Times they are a changin’)

I don’t know your politics now. There are some who question that. There are quite a few who don’t like that they just gave you the Nobel for literature. I would love to tell them to go look for the answers blowing in the wind.

My wife pointed out that an Irishman already wrote you an open letter and not to bother you more. I thought you ought to know how deeply you affect people from other parts of the world too.

You’re provided the punctuation to the scattered sentences of my life. Alongside the Beatles and Ziggy and many others. But unlike the others, with you it has been your poetry. Simple and undying. And always so true.

I don’t care that you have 37 albums or sold trillions of records. Or won many awards already. We both know dreamers don’t care about all that.

Your words have been my catharsis. And the best poetry I’ve known. They’ve made me cry for the moments I’ve been given. And the moments I crave. Your words have been my morning story and my bedtime salve. They’ve been my lucky charms and my steady companions. You’ve moved me, sir. And many, many others whose ordinary lives found a little magic because of what you’ve written. Regardless of what anyone else says, your poetry has been literature many of us revere. And it has made the world so much richer.

Hey Woody Guthrie I know thar you know
All the things that I’m saying and a many times more
I’m singing you this song but I can’t sing enough..
Cause there’s not many men that’ve done the things you’ve done..
(From ‘Song for Woody’)

I’m so glad they gave you the Nobel. The world can be sane sometimes, and so ready to be taken on a trip on a magic swirling ship. There is hope yet.

The writer is a well-known pianist based in Chennai. He can be reached at [email protected]

Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi plans campaign for child rights

‘The Laureates and Leaders Initiative for Children’ will be initiated by the Kailash Satyarthi Children’s Foundation which aims to bring Nobel laureates from all disciplines and not just the Peace Prize winners as well as world leaders together to use their “moral authority” for children’s rights and fight against child slavery and trafficking.Satyarthi, 62, who shared the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Pakistani girls’ rights activist Malala Yousafzai, 18, is also working on an ambitious ‘100 million for 100 million campaign’ that will bring together 100 million youth from across the world to channelise their energy for fighting for the rights of the nearly 100 million children who are left out and are denied basic rights like education and proper healthcare.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Satyarthi said he plans to launch the ‘100 million for 100 million’ campaign by end of this year. “I always believed in globalising compassion. This time I want to engage an entire generation. We should not waste the energy, enthusiasm, eagerness and the idealism of our youth,” Satyarthi told PTI in an interview in Minneapolis, where he is attending and participating in the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize Forum, he said the energy of the youth should be harnessed and channelised for the betterment of the 100 million young people who do not have the same opportunities to grow and learn.
ALSO READ Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi urges Modi to curb child slavery as India reels from drought”They must feel that they have some moral responsibility and obligation towards the 100 million children and youth left out,” he said. Satyarthi said he wants to launch the 100 million campaign along with ‘The Laureates and Leaders Initiative’ which will be a global campaign based in India.Explaining his reasoning behind the initiative, Satyarthi said after he won the Nobel prize, he realised that while the intellectual and academic knowledge of Nobel winners in other disciplines such as chemistry, physics, literature, economics and medicine had been utilised to advance human history, their “moral authority and outreach” had “not been utilised and harnessed for children.”

Satyarthi plans campaign for child rights with laureates and world leaders 

Minneapolis: Seeking to globalise compassion, Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi plans to launch a major initiative that will enlist support of other Nobel prize winners and world leaders for the cause of neglected and abused children.

‘The Laureates and Leaders Initiative for Children’ will be initiated by the Kailash Satyarthi Children’s Foundation which aims to bring Nobel laureates from all disciplines and not just the Peace Prize winners as well as world leaders together to use their “moral authority” for children’s rights and fight against child slavery and trafficking.

Satyarthi, 62, who shared the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Pakistani girls’ rights activist Malala Yousafzai, 18, is also working on an ambitious ‘100 million for 100 million campaign’ that will bring together 100 million youth from across the world to channelise their energy for fighting for the rights of the nearly 100 million children who are left out and are denied basic rights like education and proper healthcare.

Satyarthi said he plans to launch the ‘100 million for 100 million’ campaign by end of this year.

Kailash Satyarthi in a file photo. PTIKailash Satyarthi in a file photo. PTI

Kailash Satyarthi in a file photo. PTI

“I always believed in globalising compassion. This time I want to engage an entire generation. We should not waste the energy, enthusiasm, eagerness and the idealism of our youth,” Satyarthi told PTI in an interview in Minepolis.

In the city to headline the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize Forum, he said the energy of the youth should be harnessed and channelised for the betterment of the 100 million young people who do not have the same opportunities to grow and learn.

“They must feel that they have some moral responsibility and obligation towards the 100 million children and youth left out,” he said.

Satyarthi said he wants to launch the 100 million campaign along with ‘The Laureates and Leaders Initiative’ which will be a global campaign based in India.

Explaining his reasoning behind the initiative, Satyarthi said after he won the Nobel prize, he realised that while the intellectual and academic knowledge of Nobel winners in other disciplines such as chemistry, physics, literature, economics
and medicine had been utilised to advance human history, their “moral authority and outreach” had “not been utilised and harnessed for children.”

In his conversations with other Nobel laureates about child slavery and education, Satyarthi felt that these Nobel winners, who had been so dedicated to their individual disciplines, can also contribute tremendously for the advancement of child rights.

“I started talking to them to join an initiative of laureates from all disciplines and not just the peace prize winners, as well as some of the world leaders like former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown and Former Brazilian President Luiz Lula da Silva,” he added.

“I wanted to bring those forces closer for the cause of the neglected, abused and exploited children,” he said adding that he is in contact with several global leaders and laureates and President of India Pranab Mukherjee would be the patron of this initiative,” he said.

The Laureates and Leaders would be a new initiative and platform of moral power for the betterment of children along with the 100 million for 100 million campaign, he said.

While Laureates and Leaders will be initiated by Satyarthi’s foundation with support from other individuals and institutions, the 100 million campaign would be a partnership initiative that will engage universities, youth student organisations and teachers associations to build global citizenship.

“The idea is to build this campaign to advance the value of global citizenship among young people. Nearly 100 million children are left out and are denied their basic rights, freedom, education and healthcare, Satyarthi said.

But there are 100 million young people across the world who are full of energy, enthusiasm and have tremendous idealism and hunger to prove themselves and do something for the good of the society and the world,” he added.

The campaign would primarily use social media for the purpose of sensitising people, building awareness about causes, petitioning, creating demands on governments and international community and asking corporates to ensure no child labour, child slave or trafficked youth is involved in their supply and production chains.

It will also bring citizens together to be petitioners, change makers and leaders for those 100 million children left out. Through the campaign, students, teachers and the youth can join to pressurise the government through peaceful demonstrations to prioritise children in their policies, schemes, programs and budgetary allocations, he said. “We are also trying to build the value of non-violence and peace together with global citizenship in young people,” he said.

The Forum provides an important international platform focusing on the work of the Nobel Peace Prize Laureates, as well as leading peacemakers and peacebuilders.

Over the course of the three days, Satyarthi will join leaders and experts on issues related to child slavery in conflict and commercial sexual exploitation.

The forum will also host dialogue sessions led by members of Satyarthi’s organisation ‘Bachpan Bachao Andolan’, the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Asset India Foundation.

Islam means peace: Nobel Laureate Kailash Satyarthi

“Islam means peace. There are hundreds of (references) in the Holy Quran where peace, justice, freedom and equality are taught,” Satyarthi said at the opening of the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize Forum held under the auspices of the Norwegian Nobel Institute here yesterday.Satyarthi, who shared the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Pakistani girls’ rights activist Malala Yousafzai, was asked by a young boy from Cyprus during a live global Q&A about the backlash against Muslims and rhetoric used against them by some politicians as well as the subsequent resentment against refugees amid fears that terrorists could hide among the millions fleeing conflict in countries like Syria and Iraq and seeking asylum in the western world.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Satyarthi, 62, accompanied at the forum by his wife Sumedha, said it was unfortunate that a “handful of people” were “manipulating” Islam and bringing a “bad name” to the religion for their selfish “political” ends and sometimes “emotional” reasons when Muslims across the world have been ambassadors of humanity and peace and people from Muslim countries have shown courage to speak out the truth.
ALSO READ Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi urges Modi to curb child slavery as India reels from drought”A handful of people are manipulating the religion…and even creating deep fundamentalism, brainwashing young people. We all know how ISIS and all these terror groups are functioning under the garb and name of Islam,” he said.”We oppose that kind of tendency and practise that is manipulating Islam,” he added.
ALSO READ Youngsters growing intolerant due to misguidance: Kailash SatyarthiWith children being the worst sufferers in the unprecedented refugee crisis engulfing the world, the Nobel laureate stressed that “no child wants to be a refugee” and no child has ever been responsible for war, insurgency or conflict. “But children are the worst victims. They are forced to be refugees. We should not victimise them further,” he said making a strong call to nations and its citizens to welcome refugees and not generalise them based on the actions of a few who have “tarnished” the image of Islam.Satyarthi even tweeted about the event and his dream for a better world for children.When asked by a 15-year old girl in the audience what he would do if he were the Prime Minister of India, Satyarthi said with a laugh that he “never thought about it” and would not take oath as Prime Minister “because I strongly feel that the power of ordinary people and the moral power of an ordinary person is million times more than any prime minister or any politician in the world.” Satyarthi said while progress has been made across the world to improve the condition of children and ensure basic rights to them, the work will not be complete if even a single child is forced into slavery, labour and prostitution.”Children in Nigeria, India, Pakistan are rising up and demanding good quality education. They are saying they do not want to marry at an early age, do not want tools in their hands,” he said.”Young people like Malala are rising up everywhere and choosing peace over violence, tolerance over extremism and courage over fear,” he said.”Despite of all the good work all of us have done, 168 million children are still calling not for our attention but our action. They are not just numbers,” he stressed.”The world cannot be civilised, cultured if even a single child is enslaved. If one single girl is forced to work as child prostitute, then we cannot call ourselves religious, cultured and developed world,” he said.Satyarthi kicked off the three-day 2016 Nobel Peace Prize Forum by engaging in the live-streamed global conversation moderated by Norwegian Nobel Institute’s Research Director Asle Toje with Forum delegates and youth from United Nations Children’s Fund offices around the world, including Rajasthan, Tunisia and Ghana.On questions from young girls in Ghana about the need to bridge the gap between the developed and developing world, Satyarthi said the world has a “very strong ” development agenda for the future in the form of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and leaders will have to show strong political will to achieve them.”The SDGs require genuine political will, strong social will and basic honesty among global leaders to fulfil and respect the promises they have made and to ensure that the SDG agenda is properly implemented,” he said.Having worked tirelessly his life to save children from slavery, bonded labour and trafficking, Satyarthi lamented that slavery still exists in the world and said failure of the judicial system and political will is to be blamed for this.”The worst thing happening today can be explained in three words – Slavery still exists. Modern slavery is fuelled by the greediness to earn more and more money. It is the failure of the legal systems, judicial systems, political will and society if one single child is sold for earning money,” he said.He urged young children across the world to follow the “3 Ds” of dreaming big, discovering and doing to not just ensure a better future for themselves but help others less fortunate than them.The Forum provides an important international platform focusing on the work of the Nobel Peace Prize Laureates, as well as leading peacemakers and peacebuilders. The 2016 Forum will concentrate on Satyarthi’s work (2014) of ending child slavery and child trafficking.Over the course of the three days, Satyarthi will join leaders and experts on issues related to child slavery in conflict and commercial sexual exploitation. The forum will also host dialogue sessions led by members of Satyarthi’s organisation ‘Bachpan Bachao Andolan’, the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Asset India Foundation.

China will soon have more Tagore readers than India: Consul General Ma Zhanwu

Predicting that there will soon be more readers of Rabindranath Tagore in China than in India, Chinese Consul General Ma Zhanwu has said values of the bard can show the path to the new relationship between the two neighbouring countries. “Tagore’s idea on China-India relationship could serve as useful guide as we work to deepen mutual trust, enhance friendship and develop bilateral exchanges and cooperation,” Zhanwu said.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>He said Tagore believed in Asian resurgence at a time when the West was dominant and Asians were looked down upon.”Tagore was the first Asian to be awarded the Nobel Prize in 1913. He gave us the courage that our message could also be useful and valid for the rest of the world,” the diplomat told PTI. It was for the first time yesterday that the Chinese consulate had celebrated Tagore’s 155th birth anniversary in a big way with a conference on the bard’s relationship with China where he had gone in 1924.According to the English calendar, Tagore was born on May 7 but Bengalis celebrate the occasion according to the Bengali calendar – 25th day of ‘Baisakh’ month which is today.The consul general said Tagore has a huge following in Asia, but nowhere is he more alive than in China, where his works have been part of middle-school curriculum for decades.”We will soon have more Tagore readers in China than you have in India,” he said, adding that there may already be more Yoga teachers in China than India. He cites the example of her 14-year-old daughter Yuning Ma, who started reciting Tagore poems when she was nine. “She does it in a very emotional way and in both Chinese and English languages,” Zhanwu said.On Tagore’s philosophy, he said the Nobel laureate envisioned and advocated India-China fraternal partnership and civilisational leadership, which is increasingly pertinent with the rise of both the countries as important nations in the world and when mankind needs more contribution by the two neighbours. Tagore’s idea was that Asia must find its own voice to build an Asian synergy, he said. “We have our own ways of doing things and it may suit us better than if we just copy things from the West,” the diplomat said.Professor Liu Shuxiong of Peking University said Bengali is taught in various universities of China and they have plans to take more students in the language, which he describes as being very important to study India and Tagore. China has translated a number of poems, essays and dramas written by Tagore. “Tagore’s values are very much shared by the people of the two countries. Tagore was very much inspired by Chinese philosophy,” Zhanwu said.

Adding a personal ‘touch’: Lalu Prasad Yadav endorses Ramdev’s Patanjali cream

As regular people, we have all added a personal touch to the things we do. Well, yoga guru and human rubberband, Baba Ramdev isn’t that far behind.

Although Ramdev visited Lalu Prasad Yadav’s house to invite the latter to attend International Yoga Day celebrations, there was a lot more going on behind the scenes. According to The Statesman, the guru was at Lalu’s house to demonstrate the aforementioned ‘personal touch’ — he was massaging the RJD chief ‘s face with a ‘special’ Patanjali cream, as the latter beamed, “I am a permanent brand ambassador of Ramdev’s Patanjali products.” If you’re interested in seeing how it went down, there’s even a video of it.

Ramdev even tweeted after:

This is a steady turnaround from Lalu’s vitriol attacks, which are usually aimed at “high-profile saints” that include the Patanjali founder and Nobel Peace Prize refuser Sri Sri Ravishankar. Even as recent as last month, at a function to mark 125th anniversary of BR Ambedkar, the Bihar politician described Baba Ramdev as a “capitalist and industrialist of the country”, and that he along with other saints/babas are making fools out of people, in the guise of religion.

So what could be the reason for this impressive backflip and the start of a fruitful bromance?

Back in 2015, it seemed like Lalu had a few defensive words for the baba when the latter was caught using animal bones in his medicines. Business Standard reported that Lalu was fine with the use of animal bones as long as it treated the disease. Perhaps things have been blowing hot and cold between them and it took a ‘cosmetic’ aligning of the stars for the duo to patch up? It’s also important to note that Lalu has a thing for well-maintained skin — remember his remarks about Hema Malini’s skin? His claim that he’d make Bihar’s roads as smooth as Hema Malini’s cheeks.

Never mind the background, the two leaders’ too-close-for-comfort-politics is surely entertaining. Who knows, maybe Lalu might be drafted as a model for Patanjali.

(With inputs from IANS)

Take a deep breath! Sri Sri’s comments on Malala aren’t hypocritical… at all

No, no, Sri, Sri is not god, god.

In the Indian belief system, it takes 1,008 Sris to attain divinity. And since Ravishankar has only doubled his Sris so far, he has a long way to go.

Double Sri, I presume, knows this. So he is competing with lesser mortals like Malala Yousafzai. Good for him. Malala has still not started insisting on an extra Mohtarma before her name, so Ravishankar has a decent start over the teenager in the battle of titles.

The only problem is the Nobel Peace Prize the teenager already has in her kitty.

But, on Monday, Sri Square brushed that achievement aside like a trinket won at a kindergarten sack race to re-establish his lead. That girl did nothing to deserve it and is, thus, an unworthy achiever, he argued.

File image of Sri Sri Ravishankar. Image courtesy: Art of Living website

File image of Sri Sri Ravishankar. Image courtesy: Art of Living website

No, I don’t think this has anything to do with the Art of Envying. Also, nobody saw him eating sour grapes, considering the fact that he was in drought-stricken Latur, where such succulent fruits are more precious than a Nobel.

In the universe that Ravishankar lords over, not breathing deep enough pretty much amounts to doing nothing. Since Malala would not have taken enough deep breaths while on the ventilator after taking a bullet in the neck from the Taliban, Double Sri is perfectly entitled to hold her in contempt.

In fact, even before she defied death and breath, Sri may have found Malala unworthy for holding her breath while going to school in spite of fighting a fatwa from the Taliban against schooling for girls.

Such is our life and it’s an interesting time when someone who teaches us our natural instincts — deep breathing for instance — considers himself worthy of a Nobel. In a parallel universe, even Vātsyāyana could have done so for teaching us the 56 ways of performing Sudarshan Sex.

A friend recently shared his formula for happiness on Facebook.

Drink single malts and dance, he said, looking a good 10 years younger than he actually is. At 40, his tresses are not as black and long as Double Sri’s at 59. But he too appears to be completely at peace with himself. If Nitish Kumar doesn’t become the Prime Minister of India, I foresee this proponent of drunken dancing — as against Sri’s formula of breathing and dancing — as a perfectly legitimate guru of happiness in a few years.

The point is, when you can ensure people are completely at peace with themselves by teaching them to breathe, fornicate, drink, dance — essentially the things that make us humans happy — those like Malala who get the Nobel for resisting terrorists and getting a bullet in return are simply wasting their time.

Ravishankar has proved this many times. A few years ago, Double Sri made a surprise visit to meet the violent Gujjars demanding reservation in Rajasthan. He taught them to breathe, dance and left the same evening.

Unfortunately the Gujjars didn’t. They continued to block roads, highways and railway tracks till Chief minister Vasundhara Raje gave them more than a few extra breaths: The promise of reservation and the luxury of home-cooked food to their leader Kirori Singh at her official residence.

A few years later, they returned on the tracks. But Sri Sri didn’t.

Similarly, Guruji is believed to have offered to calm the agitated minds of Islamic State fighters in Iraq and Syria. Ravishankar claims he had sent a missive to Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and his fighters for peace through dialogue. Unfortunately, the IS sent him a photo of a decapitated head that vaguely resembled his own in return.

“I tried to initiate peace talks with the (IS) recently but they sent me a photograph of a beheaded body of a man. Thus, my effort for a peace dialogue with the IS ended,” he said.

In many ways, Ravishankar can do with a Nobel, if not for the honour, at least for the money. Last heard, his organisation was still to pay the fine imposed by the National Green Tribunal for meddling with the ecology around the Yamuna.

But, Sri Sri has vowed to never accept the Nobel. It is political, he told farmers at Latur while quenching their thirst with deep breaths and yogic postures.

He may not yet be Sri Sri 1,008 god incarnate.

But you can certainly not accuse Padma Vibhushan Ravishankar of hypocrisy.

Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi urges Modi to curb child slavery as India reels from drought

Nobel Peace Laureate Kailash Satyarthi has appealed to the prime minister of India to prioritise children and ensure they are not trafficked, forced into marriage or put into bonded labour as the country reels from its worst drought in decades.In a letter to Narendra Modi, the child rights activist urged him to declare the drought a national emergency, saying that the lives of more than 160 million children were at stake.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>”Reports of children being forced into child labour, trafficking, child marriage, and the devadasi (dedicating girls to service in temples) system are coming to light with children increasingly dropping out from school … and large scale migration due to this crisis,” Satyarthi wrote.
ALSO READ Drought relief: Maharashtra seeks Rs 9,200 crore, Centre grants it to the last pennyThe letter was circulated to the media on Tuesday by his office.”Owing to this drought and the on-going water crisis, children are becoming increasingly vulnerable. In the coming months, there is an increased risk of lakhs (hundreds of thousands) of children becoming victims of these circumstances.”
ALSO READ Daughters of drought: The vicious cycle of poverty in the parched lands of Karnataka and Maharashtra The government estimates more than 330 million people – almost a quarter of India’s population – have been hit by the scarcity of water in states such as Maharashtra in the west and Karnataka in the south.As crops wither and livestock perish, ten of thousands of people are migrating in search of food, water and jobs, leaving behind women, children and older family members who are vulnerable to exploitation by traffickers.
ALSO READ In times of drought, sugar beet is economically more viable than sugarcaneFigures given by Satyarthi’s office showed the number of children dropping out of school in the ten drought-affected states had risen by 22 percent, while child trafficking cases had increased by 24%.Satyarthi, who was awarded the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize jointly with Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, ended his letter calling upon Modi make children “a top priority” in the government’s relief and rehabilitation efforts.

‘Declare drought as national emergency’: Kailash Satyarthi urges PM Modi

New Delhi: Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi on Tuesday urged Prime Minister Narendra Modi to immediately declare drought as a “national emergency”, saying it had badly hit children in rural areas.

Over 16.3 crore children were affected by the “severe drought situation”, Satyarthi said in a letter to Modi that was released to the media.

The child rights activist said the drought across 10 states had led to rampant child marriage, child labour and kidnapping of children.

Child rights activist Kailash Satyarthi. ReutersChild rights activist Kailash Satyarthi. Reuters

Child rights activist Kailash Satyarthi. Reuters

“Owning to this drought and the ongoing water crisis, children are becoming increasingly vulnerable,” Satyarthi said in the letter.

“Reports of children being forced into child labour, trafficking, child marriage and the Devadasi system are coming to light,” he added.

Satyarthi’s Bachpan Bachao Andolan put the figures of missing children in the country at 35,873, those abducted at 22,014 and those forced into child labour at 74,84,416.

“Hope the prime minister listens to the ‘Mann ki Baat’ of these 16.3 crore children,” Satyarthi said.

He said the figures he had produced were based on government records.

Delhi: 19 minors rescued after raids at fake placement agencies, four persons arrested

New Delhi: Nineteen minors, including 14 tribal girls, were rescued on Tuesday after raids at fake placement agencies and a chocolate manufacturing unit in north-west Delhi, police said.

Representational image. Reuters

Representational image. Reuters

The raids, which followed an investigation by Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA), the organisation founded by Nobel prize winner Kailash Satyarthi, were conducted by officials of the local police and administration.

Four persons were arrested for allegedly bringing children from poor families to Delhi and giving them up to serve as menial workers at low wages, sources said a BBA representative.

The girls, who hailed from different districts of Jharkhand, Assam and West Bengal, were rescued during raids at four “illegal” placement agencies based in the Shakurpur area, said a senior police officer.

The five boys were rescued during another raid at a chocolate manufacturing unit in the Keshavpuram area.

“Almost half of the stay-at-home labour employed in Delhi is underage. This constitutes about 5 lakh minors who are being abused and neglected in the capital,” claimed RS Chaurasia, chairperson of the organisation.

Finally! Nobel panel condemns fatwa against Salman Rushdie, 27 years after it was issued

Stockholm: The Swedish Academy, which selects the winners of the Nobel Prize in literature, has condemned an Iranian death warrant against British writer Salman Rushdie, 27 years after it was pronounced.

Salman Rushdie. ReutersSalman Rushdie. Reuters

Salman Rushdie. Reuters

Two members quit the academy in 1989 after it refused to condemn Ayatollah Ruholla Khomeini’s fatwa against Rushdie for allegedly blaspheming Islam in his book The Satanic Verses. Citing its code against political involvement, the academy issued a statement defending free expression but without explicitly supporting Rushdie.

However, in a statement posted on its website Thursday, the academy for the first time denounced the fatwa and reward money for Rushdie’s death as “flagrant breaches of international laws.”

It didn’t specify what prompted its change of heart, but cited state-run Iranian media outlets’ recent decision to raise the bounty by $600,000.

AP

Mother Teresa’s canonisation will take place on 4 September; Pope Francis approves of sainthood

Vatican City, Holy See: Pope Francis on Tuesday formally approved Mother Teresa’s elevation to sainthood and set 4 September as the date for her canonisation.

The move comes 19 years after the death of the missionary nun who dedicated most of her adult life to working with the poor of Kolkata, India.

The announcement was expected after Francis in December approved a second miracle attributed to Mother Teresa’s intercession — the final hurdle to make her a saint.

The committee of senior clerics that approves elevations to sainthood met from around 0900 GMT on Tuesday with the long-awaited green light seen as a formality, nearly two decades after her death.

File photo of Mother Teresa. ReutersFile photo of Mother Teresa. Reuters

File photo of Mother Teresa. Reuters

Pope Francis then signed a decree approving the canonisation of the 1979 Nobel peace prize winner and announced a date and venue for it to happen.

The Albanian nun and missionary was one of five candidates considered for sainthood, but by far the most high-profile.

The canonisation will happen on the eve of the anniversary of her 1997 death, for which a celebration of her memory had already been scheduled as part of the Church’s Jubilee Year of Mercy.

Indian Catholics had hoped Francis would travel to India for the canonisation ceremony but, barring a last minute surprise, it is expected to take place in Rome with a thanksgiving ceremony scheduled for the following month in the Indian city.

Known across the world, Teresa was awarded the Nobel for her work with the poor, sick, old and lonely in the teeming slums of Kolkata, previously known as Calcutta.

She is revered by many Catholics but has also been attacked as a “religious imperialist” who attempted to foist her beliefs on an impoverished community in which they had no indigenous roots.

From sister to sainthood

Born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu to Albanian parents in 1910 in what is now Skopje in Macedonia, Teresa arrived in India in 1929, having first spent time with a missionary order in Ireland.

She went on to found the Missionaries of Charity order in 1950 and was granted Indian citizenship a year later.

Last year she was credited by Vatican experts with inspiring the 2008 recovery of a Brazilian man suffering from multiple brain tumours, thus meeting the Church’s standard requirement for sainthood of having been involved in two certifiable miracles.

She was beatified by Pope John Paul II in 2003 following a fast-track process involving the recognition of a claim she had posthumously inspired the 1998 healing of a Bengali tribal women.

Francis met Teresa before he became pope, in 1994, and later joked that she had seemed so formidable he “would have been scared if she had been my mother superior”.

Others were much harsher in their judgement with the likes of Germaine Greer and polemicist Christopher Hitchens accusing her of contributing to the misery of the poor with her strident opposition to contraception and abortion.

In her Nobel acceptance speech she described terminations of pregnancies as “direct murder by the mother herself.”

Questions have also been raised over the Missionaries of Charity’s finances, as well as conditions in the order’s hospices.

A series of her letters published in 2007 also caused some consternation among admirers, as it became clear that she had suffered crises of faith for most of her life.

India granted her a state funeral after her death and her grave in the order’s headquarters has since become a pilgrimage site.

with inputs from agencies

Child labour can disrupt ‘Make in India’ programme, Nobel Laureate Kailash Satyarthi tells PM Modi

Nobel Laureate Kailash Satyarthi feels that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Make in India’ programme will prove to be a “big disaster” if child labour laws are not strengthened.In a letter to the Prime Minister, Satyarthi has said, “If investors are coming from foreign countries to manufacture in India and if your laws are so weak in child labour in comparison to international standards then it will become a big disaster”.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>He says that the ‘Make in India’ programme is a great move, but it also exposes a serious weakness of the country.”Make in India” cannot be successful on the toil, miseries and abuses of young children in the manufacturing sector,” the 62-year-old founder of ‘Bachpan Bachao Andolan’ told PTI.Giving the example of Apple, he said the US-based company faced a lot of criticism after allegations that child labour in China was being used to manufacture their products.”In India, child labour is working because your law allows it. These big brands will be dependent on local producers who are free to employ children. But the international media and human rights organisations are not going to spare us,” said the child rights activist who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014 along with Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai.He was in Kolkata to support the Rotary India Literacy Mission.On one hand, Satyarthi said, the government was talking about a ‘clean India’, ‘Skill India’ and ‘Digital India’ missions, but on the other hand children were being employed in tea shops, slaughter houses, restaurants and hazardous industries.His current concern is the Child Labour Prohibition and Regulation Amendment Bill where the list of prohibited occupations for children has been reduced to only three from the earlier 83.The proposed amendment also allows children of any age to work in family enterprises or house-based industries.”I am calling upon all MPs that please don’t fail children again and again. The entire political class has to own up the responsibility of our children. If you allow child labour, you also allow unemployment,” the Nobel laureate said.Describing child labour as a form of modern day slavery, he said kids were preferred because it is cheap to hire them.”If the amendment was passed it would become legal to employ children in hazardous industries like e-waste, zari/embroidery works, butcheries, tanneries, glass industry, etc.zari/embroidery works, butcheries, tanneries, glass industry, etc.”Even in family-based industries most of them are hazardous and most of the trafficked and enslaved children work under the garb of an ‘extended family’. That is a big grey area,” Satyarthi said while describing the Bill as “regressive.The Bill would also go against the Constitution which makes education a constitutional right, he pointed out.He started the fight against child labour in 1981 when India had no law against child labour. In 1986, Child Labour Prohibition and Regulation Act was passed. Till now Satyarthi and his Bachpan Bachao Andolan team has rescued over 83,000 children.According to a report by the International Labour Organisation (ILO), there are 5.7 million child workers in India between the ages of 5 and 17.

Education can push GDP by additional 4%, says Kailash Satyarthi

The Indian economy can clock an addition of 4% in the growth rate if everyone is educated over the next 10 years, Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi said on Saturday.”If we educate everyone over the next 10 years, then our GDP growth rate will be higher by 4%. The path to sustained economic growth rate lies in quality education,” he said while addressing a conference of the Rotary India Literacy Mission.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>He described illiteracy as the biggest impediment to the growth of any country.Identifying apathy, fear, and intolerance as the three biggest enemies before the world now, he regretted that today’s youths are more intolerant and impatient than their preceding generation.”Intolerance is also growing globally among children. Today’s youth are not so tolerant as you were in your past. They do not have that much of patience,” Satyarthi said.Besides intolerance, he said, the two other serious enemies before the world are apathy and fear.”There is competition everywhere, whether in office or elsewhere. This is narrowing our minds and we are being apathetic to our neighbours,” he said, adding that terrorism results into fear across the globe.Satyarthi said education was the answer to the ills as it could bring in virtues like empathy, ethics, and excellence.He said as long as children remain the cheapest source of labour, adults would remain jobless.On Rotary India’s mission to eradicate illiteracy from the country, he promised he and his organisation would work with the Rotarians to ensure additional one lakh children go to school every year.Besides the ‘Bachpan Bachao Andolan’, he has also started the Kailash Satyarthi Children’s Foundation after winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014.

Find solutions to climate change, energy crisis: PM Modi to students

Citing global problems of climate change, energy crisis and deadly diseases, Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Monday asked the Indian students to take up the challenge of finding solutions to these through innovation and research instead of merely doing “cut-paste” work.Addressing the convocation ceremony of the Benares Hindu University (BHU) here, he asked students to “keep the mind receptive and eager to fresh knowledge” even after their formal education was complete.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>”I want to throw this challenge before young men and women of this country. Come up with innovations that may help the world in bringing down temperatures a bit, help the humanity overcome the grave energy crisis it is likely to face if renewable and sustainable alternative sources are not found”, Modi told the gathering of BHU scholars and academics.He said students should dream of finding solutions to the problems that are being faced by the country and the world.”Innovation is most important for us… New research, not just to obtain PhDs through cut-paste…,” he said.As his remarks drew an amused response from the audience, the Prime Minister quipped he had felt that those at BHU would not be aware of “cut-paste” aspect of research but even if they were, he hoped they did not use it.He said he had in the past consulted Nobel laureates about the prevalence of “sickle-cell disease in tribal families” which is even worse than cancer. But, he felt “our own researchers can find a better solution”.Talking about global warming with which the world is struggling to cope with, he said Indians believe exploitation of nature is a crime and see God in plants and mother in a river. “In such a country, can’t we find a concrete solution to global warming,” Modi asked.In the context of energy crisis, he said a solution could emerge through research on how ethanol could be effectively used as a fuel, which would benefit sugarcane farmers as well.He said research is also needed in making renewable energy increasingly viable.

JNU Row: 86 academicians including Noam Chomsky, Orhan Pamuk extend support to students

Eminent scientists and writers from across the world, including renowned thinker Noam Chomsky and Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk, have joined the chorus of protest against the arrest of JNU students’ union president Kanhaiya Kumar in a sedition case.A statement signed by 86 academicians from renowned universities abroad condemns “the culture of authoritarian menace that the present government in India has generated” and said those in power are replicating the dark times of an oppressive colonial period and of the Emergency of the mid-1970s.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>”We have learnt of the shameful act of the Indian government which, invoking sedition laws formulated by India’s colonial rulers, ordered the police to enter the JNU campus and unlawfully arrest a student leader, Kanhaiya Kumar, on charges of inciting violence — without any proof whatever of such wrongdoing on his part,” the statement said. “Kumar, whose speech (widely available in a video) cannot in any way be connected with the slogans uttered on the previous day, was nonetheless arrested for ‘anti-national’ behaviour and for violating the sedition laws against the incitement to violence,” it added.The statement also condemned police’s action in this matter, saying it had brought “great dishonour” to the government.The academicians urged “all those genuinely concerned about the future of India and Indian universities to protest in wide mobilisation against it”. “Since there is no evidence to establish these charges, we can only conclude that this arrest is further evidence of the present government’s deeply authoritarian nature, intolerant of any dissent, setting aside India’s long-standing commitment to toleration and plurality of opinion, replicating the dark times of an oppressive colonial period and briefly of the emergency in the mid-1970s,” it said.The JNU students’ union president was arrested last week in connection with a case of sedition and criminal conspiracy that was registered following an event on the varsity campus to protest against the hanging of Parliament attack convict Afzal Guru during which anti-India slogans were allegedly raised.

#PachauriHatgaya: Letter Kachori never wrote on being asked to go on indefinite leave

Teri Colleagues and My Friends,

I am quite used to writing smutty novels with graphic details of an old pervert’s sexual fantasies and salacious text messages to colleagues young enough to be my daughter. But, drafting a leave application for everybody’s eyes makes me feel like scratching my predator’s whiskers.

But, since resigning, proceeding on indefinite leave, returning and then going back on indefinite leave consume most of my energy, resources and intellect (MERI, for brevity) during day time, I might as well get used to the idea of writing something more than sexting.

Well, it is that time of the year again when I need to dig up a deep hole somewhere to hide from the outrage over my ability to dig up girls at an age most people should be digging up a phone directory to contact somebody to dig their grave. All this because they have dug up more skeletons in meri dear Teri.

It’s a shame, actully. Last year, after resigning as head of International Panel of Climax Control (not that Panel on Climate headed by a man of similar tastes and temperament), I had hibernated for long to escape the world that had exploded because of a senior citizen’s ability to do unmentionable things to his junior colleagues.

RK Pachauri. ReutersRK Pachauri. Reuters

RK Pachauri. Reuters

I returned for two reasons. One, there was an alarming increase in complaints of harassment by the local fauna — basically anything that moves — since I ventured amidst them. And, two, I assumed that the world would have started lacerating itself with penance — note to myself: must call up Tarun Tejpal to get the next farewell missive right — for hounding and grounding a man so eager to discharge his duties towards mankind and womankind, especially the latter.

I mean, only flaccid fools will ask a man to quit just because he wears trousers in office only to keep his ankles warm, or because he knows that harass is not a single word but perks of power defined by two words?

Why don’t they get it? I have money, I have power, I am Nobel, so, why can’t I give up all these material pursuits and take up the missionary position in office?

O Tempora! O Mores! O Bill Clinton! O, all those blighted Os.

Silly me! Just when I had taken time off my pervert pursuits and said yes to the offer of taking up a position of power, something that would have allowed a man like me to be on top again, they started talking about my past. And now have to go on leave for an indefinite period.

I thought I was so clever. With the media focus having shifted from my dark deeds, my victims giving up their fight and quitting the organisation and the board of directors solidly behind me, I presumed that I will return to a hero’s welcome. Like Bill Clinton returning as a Starr to the Oval Office after being needlessly hounded for enjoying similar perks of power.

And what is this fuss about accepting degrees from me? Schools and colleges can only teach you so much. But only a self-taught man like me can prematurely articulate, yes, I mean articulate, the importance of perversion, shamelessness, hypocrisy, immorality, moral squalor, treachery, cheating, predatory instincts — in short all the qualities that turn us into beasts — in the corporate jungle.

I think the loss is all theirs. I might yet get to ogle and pounce at some other girl student at some other convocation in some other university, but these students will be permanently devoid of my quick guide to a Nobel cause.

I am tempted to say to them what all Punjabis love to…Teri …But then some might wrongly interpret that I am bequeathing the organisation to some of their relatives I may be eyeing.

Instead, I am making a quick Return to Almora, which, incidentally is the name of the unreadable porn I wrote. Guess what! I was promised the Bad Sex Fiction prize for it. And just when I was drafting my acceptance speech, they gave me something more Noble.

Anyway, to get to the climax without any more wordplay, I am proceeding on leave till further notice. I hope, in my absence, you will not do to the cause of climax control, what I always scheme of doing to those young colleagues.

And don’t go anywhere. Like the Predator — or was it Terminator? — I shall be back once the current outrage dies down and people forget that what I am hiding in my beard isn’t just a twig but a whole nest.

Nothing can destroy people like me. As long as the world has few good men and — wink, wink — lots of beautiful women, I will go on and on.

I remain, as always,

Slimy As Kachori

#PachauriHatao: Second complainant comes forward, alleges Pachauri harassed her sexually in 2003

Days after RK Pachauri was appointed the executive vice chairman of The Energy and Resources Institute, a former TERI worker has come forward with the allegation that the former TERI director general sexually harassed her while she was working at the institute. The complainant, the second to make this allegation, joined TERI in 2003 and worked for a year, reports CNN-IBN.

  Complaint against R.K. Pachauri

RK Pachauri. AFPRK Pachauri. AFP

RK Pachauri. AFP

The complainant’s lawyer told CNN-IBN that she had raised the assault case with TERI but was discouraged. She had even filed an FIR and tried to raise the issue but the police refused to record her statement.

“I learnt about the FIR against Mr RK Pachauri through news reports in the media. This of
course did not surprise me since I had been sexually harassed by him and had seen him
behave extremely indecently with other women at TERI too,” the complaint reads. “Mr RK Pachauri would use the excuse of work assignments to repeatedly call me to his office room, even though there was no real work that he needed to discuss. This made me feel very uncomfortable and I used to try to dodge some meetings or ask my colleagues to go for the meetings.”

According to her, Pachauri “renamed” her “xxxx”, and began to refer to her by that appellation. “On one occasion, when he had called me to his sixth floor office room to discuss work, he told me that he could lift hefty and heavy women, and so lifting me would not be a problem for him,” she has alleged.

The complainant is the second woman to allege Pachauri sexually harassed her. In 2015, a young research analyst had accused him of sexual harassment and registered a case against him on 13 February.

The charges compelled Pachauri, who received the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), to step down as chair of the IPCC and Prime Minister’s Council on Climate Change.

A three-member panel found Pachauri guilty, but in September 2015, Ranjana Saikia, the head of TERI’s Internal Complaints Committee who headed the panel, resigned from her post without any explanation. In November 2015, the first complainant quit her post at Teri, saying that the treatment meted out to her by the organisation has harmed her “mentally, professionally and economically”.

Against this backdrop, Pachauri’s recent appointment brought him a lot of backlash with the first complainant even writing an open letter about it. In an interview, she said that now she believes the courts are her only hope for justice.

Meanwhile, the second complainant told NDTV that she is not going to give up hope. “Cynicism is easy to come by but one has to keep trying and one will,” she said.

Why Arvind Kejriwal chose to wear sandals with socks in front of President Hollande

Recently, a businessman from Visakhapatnam sent Arvind Kejriwal Rs 364 to buy a pair of formal shoes because he felt the Delhi CM embarrassed everyone by wearing sandals with socks at a banquet at Rashtrapati Bhavan which was hosted in honour of French President Francois Hollande.Businessman Sumit Agarwal, who I am sure didn’t expect this to go viral, claimed that Kejriwal’s particular footwear wasn’t justified since he was representing the country and not ‘staging a dharna at an AAP rally at Ramlila Maidan or Jantar Mantar’.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>His open letter said: “Kejriwal was at the President’s dinner at the Rashtrapati Bhavan, not a friend’s birthday party in a restaurant in Hauz Khas. While dressing as per one’s convenience is a question of personal liberty, some places are above personal preferences…You’re a grown man. Please act according to the situation & dress for the occasion.”What Mr. Agarwal fails to realise is that the sandal with socks is part of Arvind Kejriwal’s chosen projection for the masses, along with his oversized shirts, sweaters, frayed pants and muffler. That’s Arvind Kejriwal’s public image, a contrast perhaps to the immaculately tailored Narendra Modi in his bandhgalas and suits. It doesn’t matter to Mr Kejriwal, what image it sends to Francois Hollande but it does matter what the masses think of him.In a democracy, where we vote on the basis of characteristics like looks, caste and ideology (when we should simply be voting for able administrators), Kejriwal’s choice is part of his projection to the masses, just like Gandhi hand-picked his attire to irk the British and unite Indians.In fact, it might be a little more than just the image he wants to portray. French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, who turned down the Nobel Prize in Literature, argued that all of us have an image of ourselves in our head which we tend to project to the world and want the world to accept.Maybe, Arvind Kejriwal’s image isn’t just about what he wants to project, but what he sees himself as in his head. Perhaps, in his mind, he’s the champion of the middle-class, dressing like them.Either way, AK would get more traction wearing sandals in front of the President of Sartre’s land than he would get wearing shoes. There’s no point harping about image and protocol because Mr Kejriwal probably doesn’t care. In his head, through the image he’s projecting, he’s bringing a revolution, which frankly has no time, place or inclination for protocol.

Sri Sri Ravishankar to be nominated for Nobel Peace Prize?

There are a lot of names doing the rounds for this year’s list of nominees for the Nobel Peace Prize. And one of them is Sri Sri Ravi Shankar.A report in Hindustan Times states that the founder of the Art of Living Foundation has been key in the peace negotiations in Columbia. The Thompson Reuters foundation has stated on its blog, “The Norwegian Nobel Institute does not publish names of nominees, but Nobel watchers have said former US spy agency contractor Edward Snowden and peace negotiators in Colombia have also been nominated.”<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>The possible list of nominees includes an 85-year-old Greek grandmother photographed bottle-feeding a Syrian baby refugee and Hollywood actress Susan Sarandon for her work for refugees in Greece, says the daily. But the Art of Living Foundation spokesperson has told the daily that they were not aware of Sri Sri’s nomination. The report adds that the Art of Living Foundation played an important role in bringing peace in Columbia since November 2012. The Columbian government had in July, 2015, honoured Sri Sri with their highest civilian award, ‘Orden de la Democracia Simón Bolívar’, in recognition of his work. When he was in Cuba in 2015, Sri Sri also held discussions with leaders of the FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) as part of a confidence building measure in Columbia, adds the report. Sri Sri Ravi Shankar was conferred the Padma Vibhushan, the second highest civilian honour, in January this year.The nominee list for the Nobel Peace Prize closes on February 1 and is announced in October. Three Indians have received it so far – Mother Teresa (1979), founder of Missionaries of Charity, the 14th Dalai Lama (1989), head of the Tibetan government in exile, and children’s rights and education advocate Kailash Satyarthi (2014) who shared the distinction with Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan.

INS Kadmatt commissioned; Navy Chief RK Dhowan stresses on indigenisation

Flag Officer Commanding-in Chef, Eastern Naval Command Vice-Admiral Satish Soni said the Indian Navy has had a long association with the GRSE, which delivered the first warship INS Ajay in 1961. Chairman and Managing Director of the GRSE Rear Admiral A K Verma (retired) said with the latest technology the shipyard had been constructing 95 warships and has already delivered 62 of them to the Indian Navy.

PTI
Info

TOP
<!– /.block –>TOP <!– /.block –>
<</h2>
Nobel laureate Amartya Sen praises Arvind Kejriwal’s Odd-Even scheme <!– /.block –>
<!– /.block –>
<!– /.block –>
<!– /.block –>
Also ReadIndiadna Must Read for evening: From Mehbooba Mufti taking over as J&K CM to Aamir Khan’s replacement for ‘Incredible India’ and moreIndiaMalda violence: TMC has failed to control communal incidents, says CPI(M)IndiaINS Kadmatt commissioned; Navy Chief RK Dhowan stresses on indigenisationIndiaNobel laureate Amartya Sen praises Arvind Kejriwal’s Odd-Even scheme IndiaIndian-American women earn more than white men in US: ReportIndiaPDP writes to Governor, backs Mehbooba Mufti as next Jammu and Kashmir CM <!– /.block –>

<!– /#sidebar-second –>Jugnoo to enroll female drivers, registers first in Noida<!– /.block –>Nobel laureate Amartya Sen praises Arvind Kejriwal’s Odd-Even scheme <!– /.block –> <!– /#content_bottom –>
<!– /11440465/DNA_Article_Desktop_970x90_BTF –><!– /.block –><!– /11440465/DNA_Article_Tablet_728x90_BTF –><!– /.block –> <!– /#bottom_bar –>

<!– footer start –>

Partner site: Zee News
©2016 Diligent Media Corporation Ltd.

<!– footer end –><!– ExpCom CGP –>

Modi govt neglecting education, healthcare more than UPA did: Amartya Sen

The Nobel prize-winner economist also said that India’s nuclear power plants pose danger. “I am worried our environmental sensitivities are confined to carbon,” he added.<!– /11440465/Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>

TOP
<!– /.block –>TOP <!– /.block –>
<</h2>
Pathankot terror attack: Doval talks tough, asks Pak NSA to take effective action <!– /.block –>
<!– /.block –>
<!– /.block –>
<!– /.block –>
Also ReadIndiaDid not receive any money as DDCA Chief: Arun Jaitley tells courtIndiaPathankot terror attack – Bury slain terrorists in pigskin: Tripura Guv Tathagata RoyIndiaDelhi University’s nod to seminar on Ram Janmabhoomi; students, faculty opposeIndiaSC bans entry of heavy vehicles in Delhi from 4 more entry pointsIndiaPathankot terror attack: Punjab Police SP Salwinder Singh to be examined by NIAIndiaNo transfer for employees with Thalassemia, Haemophiliac kids: Centre <!– /.block –>

<!– /#sidebar-second –>Australia T20s chance to test combination, says MS Dhoni<!– /.block –>Pathankot terror attack: Doval talks tough, asks Pak NSA to take effective action<!– /.block –> <!– /#content_bottom –>
<!– /11440465/DNA_Article_Desktop_970x90_BTF –><!– /.block –><!– /11440465/DNA_Article_Tablet_728x90_BTF –><!– /.block –> <!– /#bottom_bar –>

<!– footer start –>

Partner site: Zee News
©2016 Diligent Media Corporation Ltd.

<!– footer end –><!– ExpCom CGP –>